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30% Of Obama-Care Enrollees Haven’t Paid Premiums

From the New York Times (of all places):

Not All Health Care Premiums Are Paid Up, House Panel Says

By ROBERT PEAR | April 30, 2014

WASHINGTON — A House committee said Wednesday that only two-thirds of people signing up for private health insurance in the federal exchange had paid their premiums by April 15.

The deadline for paying your first premium was January 1st, which was the beginning of the coverage year.

Without payment, consumers will not have coverage.

Ha!

The Obama administration questioned the accuracy of the numbers, but provided none of its own.

Which is typical of them.

Republican leaders of the panel, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, said they had obtained the data from all insurance companies participating in the federal marketplace..

Those liars?

Erin Shields Britt, a spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services, said the committee data did “not match up with public comments from insurance companies themselves, most of which indicate that 80 percent to 90 percent of enrollees have paid their premiums.” …

What do you expect these insurance companies to say? Especially, after the administration has ordered them to clam up about their numbers. But even if the number is ‘only’ 80%, that is still bad news.

Kathleen Sebelius, then the secretary of health and human services, told Congress in March that she did not know how many people had paid their premiums because the government had not finished building a “fully automated financial system” for the exchanges…

And they still haven’t finished building it. Even though it’s the main thing the exchanges were supposed to do. That is, allow people to buy insurance.

This article was posted by Steve Gilbert on Thursday, May 1st, 2014. Comments are currently closed.

One Response to “30% Of Obama-Care Enrollees Haven’t Paid Premiums”

  1. In six months as a reward they’ll get a rate increase. Then another .. then another .. then another ..


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