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ACORN And ACLU Sue – For Voter Fraud

From those defenders of the sanctity of the voting booth at the New York Times:

In Vote Fraud Case, Acorn Challenges a Law as Unconstitutional

By SEAN D. HAMILL

July 23, 2009

PITTSBURGH — The community organizing and voter registration group Acorn filed a federal lawsuit here Wednesday claiming that a state statute that is being used to prosecute some of its former employees is unconstitutional.

The group, whose official name is the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, filed the lawsuit against the Allegheny County district attorney, Stephen Zappala, who is prosecuting the former Acorn employees, and the Pennsylvania attorney general, Tom Corbett, seeking to strike down the law.

Acorn hopes the lawsuit will prevent criminal prosecution of its local leaders and office, which have been under investigation by Mr. Zappala’s office for eight months, said Witold Walczak, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania, which is representing Acorn.

“They already charged the employees, and they’ve hinted they might go after Acorn next,” said Mr. Walczak, who believes this is the first time such a law has been challenged in federal court.

“It’s the A.C.L.U.’s reading of this,” he said, “that these kind of laws that restrict an organization’s ability to hire and pay canvassers impacts on voter registration activities, which are constitutionally protected actions.”

In May, seven people — five of whom Acorn said were former employees it had fired — were charged in Allegheny County with a variety of counts related to voter registration fraud, including “solicitation of registration,” the state law being challenged in the Acorn suit.

That law makes it a crime to “give, solicit or accept payment or financial incentive to obtain a voter registration if the payment or incentive is based upon the number of registrations or applications obtained.”

Mr. Zappala said he had agreed to not prosecute any Acorn officials until the federal case was heard.

Although the investigations of Acorn had been pushed by the Republican Party during and after last year’s presidential election, Mr. Zappala, a Democrat, said, “I’m not concerned about the political issues; I’m just concerned that we have legal voter registrations here.”

Kevin Harley, a spokesman for Mr. Corbett, a Republican, said the attorney general’s office, which is charged with defending state laws in federal court, “will defend the lawsuit.”

“We believe the state law is constitutional,” Mr. Harley said.

Pennsylvania’s law is similar to one in Nevada that was used in May to charge Acorn’s Nevada office and two of its directors in a voter registration fraud case.

Brian Mellor, senior counsel for Project Vote, an advocacy group assisting in Acorn’s defense in Pennsylvania, said there were at least nine other states with similar laws: Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, Ohio, Washington and Wisconsin.

Several of the defendants told investigators that Acorn had imposed a quota on them, whereby they would be fired if they did not reach a set goal of about 20 new voter registrations per six-hour shift, for which they were paid $8 an hour.

But an Acorn official said the organization never had a quota. It had “performance standards,” said the official, Maryellen Hayden, head organizer for Acorn of Western Pennsylvania.

“We wouldn’t fire people if they didn’t reach those standards,” Ms. Hayden said. “We told people, ‘If you want to be the best voter registration worker, 20 to 25 cards is the standard.’ ”

The Pennsylvania law needs to be struck down, Ms. Hayden said, because “the way this law has been applied would mean that any big organization that does paid voter registration drives could be subject to charges at any time.”

“That creates a fear that could impede our First Amendment rights,” she said.

How can anyone doubt that ACORN and the ACLU only have our country’s best interests at heart?

“It’s the A.C.L.U.’s reading of this,” he said, “that these kind of laws that restrict an organization’s ability to hire and pay canvassers impacts on voter registration activities, which are constitutionally protected actions.”

Of course the ACLU would consider an organization that has a long history of systematically submitting fraudulent voter registrations to be ‘constitutionally protected.’

They are firm believers that the US Constitution is a suicide pact.

Brian Mellor, senior counsel for Project Vote, an advocacy group assisting in Acorn’s defense in Pennsylvania, said there were at least nine other states with similar laws: Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, Ohio, Washington and Wisconsin.

Note how the New York Times pretends that Project Vote is something separate and apart from ACORN, even though they are in fact one and the same – even sharing the same address and phone numbers on their IRS 990 forms.

And, lest we forget, our current President used to work for Project Vote/ACORN.

Which, in turn, returned the favor by stuffing the ballots getting him elected at the start of his brilliant career.

Several of the defendants told investigators that Acorn had imposed a quota on them, whereby they would be fired if they did not reach a set goal of about 20 new voter registrations per six-hour shift, for which they were paid $8 an hour.

But an Acorn official said the organization never had a quota. It had “performance standards,” said the official, Maryellen Hayden, head organizer for Acorn of Western Pennsylvania.

Ah yes, the fine distinctions of the radical left.

This article was posted by Steve on Thursday, July 23rd, 2009. Comments are currently closed.

15 Responses to “ACORN And ACLU Sue – For Voter Fraud”

  1. Yarddog1 says:

    How in the world can such a patently illegal group have standing to challenge a law as being unconstitutional? Oh – I forgot – The Constitution is now irrelevant. So why go about this effort in the first place? The Congress and President ignore the Constitution, so why expect anyone else to pay attention?

  2. MinnesotaRush says:

    How ’bout we introduce a new set of “performance standards,” into our voting system/laws that says if you wanna exercize your right to vote in this country .. ya’ get off your dead ass and REGISTER yourself in the appropriate manner or you don’t vote.

    How’s that for a performance standard, ACORN?

    Eliminate voter fraud – eliminate ACORN (be a good start)!

  3. curvyred says:

    I come back to the same question I always have: Why are we even paying people to register other people to vote?

    If you cannot take a proactive step to register of your own accord perhaps you do not care enough about the process to even make an informed decision.

    What a waste of money, time, and resources.

    • Right of the People says:

      Curvy,

      Ditto! If they are too lazy to get off their duffs to register to vote then to actually go out and vote, they deserve whatever government they get. Of course then it would be hard to stuff the ballot boxes if everyone had to show some ID to vote and we can’t have that. How would the Democraps ever win another election? In most states when you renew or apply for your driver’s license they can sign you up right then so it’s not that difficult.

      As far as the ACLU is concerned, we have an alternate meaning for acronym; All Criminals Love Us.

    • caligirl9 says:

      *standing in agreement with curvyred*

      When I relocated to a different county, I made a big deal of taking my newly-turned 18-year old daughter to the Registrar of Voters and we both registered in our new county, in person.

      No big deal.

  4. neocon mom says:

    Registering folks to vote should take place in at least as official a manner as voting. The more middlemen in the process, the more obvious the potential for fraud.

  5. pdsand says:

    I’ve always wondered about that sort of thing. The idea that you need to get out in public and have a voter registration drive. I mean are there really people in this country who don’t know about voting? And if so, do we really want them to vote?

    “The Pennsylvania law needs to be struck down, Ms. Hayden said, because “the way this law has been applied would mean that any big organization that does paid voter registration drives could be subject to charges at any time.”

    It really is just words to these people. The state passed the law banning paid voter registration drives *specifically* so that any big organization that does paid voter registration drives could be subject to charges at any time. The fact that you violated the law, apparently knowingly and on purpose, does not mean that the law needs to be struck down. Quite the opposite in fact.

  6. Gladius et Scutum says:

    The problem, of course, is that they are going to win. If they lose in district court, they’ll appeal, if they lose that, they’ll take it to the Supreme Court. How do you guess Ugly Betty is going to vote? Even if they lose that, it’ll become a cause celebre of the left and you’ll hear about “minority disenfranchisment” daily for… as long as it takes. And you’ll still hear about ‘minority disenfranchisment’ until all African – Americans have their proper right to vote five times per election (plus unquestioned fraud).

    • pdsand says:

      Even if they don’t win, they’ll win. Because now any prosecutor who wants to enforce the law knows that their case will be delayed for years while the very constitutionality of the law gets challenged in court. And even if the law gets upheld, I’m sure some onerous restrictions on its enforcement will be legislated by the higher courts. And then of course even if you convict a few workers, they’ll probably get a small fine, paid by our tax dollars, and be back for the next election. And I only imagine the firestorm that would ensue if anyone actually charged ACORN. And even if ACORN got shut down, they’d just be back under a different name…

  7. canary says:

    Obama’s POWER originated from the Nation of Islam.

    pg 200-203 dreams from my father barack obama

    Among the handfuls of groups to hoist the nationalist banner, only the Nation of Islam had any significant following:
    Minister Farrakhan’s sharply cadenced sermons generally drew a packed house, and still more listened to his radio broadcasts. But, the Nation’s active membership roughly the size of one Chicago’s biggest black congregations – a base of broad based programs. In fact, the physical presence of the Nation in the neighborhoods was nominal, restricted mainly to the clean-cut men in suits and bow ties who stood at the intersections of major thouroughfares selling the Nation’s newspaper, THE FINAL CALL.
    I would occasionally pick up the paper from these unfailingly polite men, in part out of sympathy to their heavy suits in the summer, their thin coats in the winter; or sometimes because my attention was caught by the sensational, tabloid-style headlines (CAUCASIAN WOMAN ADMITS: WHITES ARE THE DEVIL). Inside the front cover, one found reprints of the ministers speeches, as well as stories that could have been picked straight off the AP news wire were it not for certain editorial embellisments (“Jewish Senator Metzenbaum announced today…”). The paper also carried a health section, complete with Minister Farrakhan’s pork-free recipes; advertisements for Minister Farrakhan’s speeches on videocassette (VISA or MasterCard accepted); and promotions for a line of toiletries – toothpaste and the like – that the Nation had launched under the brand name POWER, part of strategy to encourage blacks to keep their money within their own community.
    After a time, the ads for POWER products grew less prominent in THE FINAL CALL; it seems that many who enjoyed Minister Farrakhan’s speeches continued to brush their teeth with Crest. That the POWER campaign sputtered said something about the difficulty that faced any black business – the barriers to entry, the lack of finance, the leg up that your competitors possessed after having kept you out of the game for over
    three hundred years.
    But I suspected that it also reflected the inevitable tension that arose when Minister Farrakhan’s message was reduced to the mundane realities of buying toothpaste. I tried to imagine POWER’s product manager looking over his sales projections. He might briefly wonder whether it made sense to distribute the brand in national supermarket chains where blacks preferred to shop. If he rejected that idea, he might consider whether any black-owned supermarket trying to compete against the national chains could afford to give shelf space to product guarnteed to alienate potential white customers. Would black consumers buy toothpaste through the mail? And what of the likelihood that the cheapest supplier of whatever it was that went into making toothpaste was a white man?
    Questions of competition, decisions forced by a market economy and majoritarian rule; issues of power. It was this unyielding reality – that whites were not simply phantoms to be expunged from our dreams but were an active and varied fact of our everyday lives – that finally explained how nationalism could thrive as an emotion and flounder as a program. So long as nationalism remained a cathartic curse on the white race, it could win the applause of the jobless teenager listening on the radio or the businessman watching latenight TV.,,,,There was never much room at the top of the pyramid, though; in a contest framed in such terms, the wait for black deliverance would be long indeed. During that wait, funny things happened. What in the hands of Malcolm had once seemed a call to arms, a declaration that we could no longer tolerate the intolerable, came to the very thing Malcolm had sought to root out: one more feeder of fantasy, one more mask for hypocrisy, one more excuse for inaction. Black politicians less gifted than Harold discovered what white politicans had known for a very long time: that race-baiting could make up for a host of limitations. Younger leaders, eager to make a name for themselves, upped the ante, peddling, conspiracy theories all over town- the Koreans were funding the Klan, Jewish doctors were injecting black babies with the AIDs virus. It was a shortcut to fame, if not always fortune, like sex or violence on TV, black rage always found a ready market.
    Nobody I spoke with in the neighorhood seemed to take such talk very seriously. As it was, many had already given up the hope that politics could actually improve their lives, much less make demand on them; to them, a ballot, if cast at all, was simply a ticket to a good show. Blacks had no real power to act on occasional slips into anti-Semitism or Asian-bashing, people would tell me; and anyway, black folks needed a chance to let off a little steam every once in a while – man, what do you think folks say about us behind our backs? – ”

    Is it fair to say some racism here? Obama was led to buy the Islam paper when he saw anti-White articles in Islam THE FINAL CALL. a term
    of terrorist muslims who are spreading world wide to destroy all those that don’t convert?

    Prehaps W Gates needed to let off some steam, as all blacks need to?.

    Rev Wright, once a muslim, ‘s finally a church Obama could relate too.

    enjoy this LA campaign speech from Obama without teleprompter (eh uh ah) stating his Father’s origin, his experience living in Indonesia (6-10 yrs old)
    and creditability in the muslim world.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpjWAzqAwcw&feature=related

  8. BillK says:

    Yet somehow ACORN’s lawsuit won’t immediately get thrown out because they “don’t have standing” like other Constitutional lawsuits of late.

  9. U NO HOO says:

    From the picture it looks like someone has stolen Post Office trays.

    • canary says:

      U NO HOO, I thought the same. Gosh, I can’t remember when the last few years I read that the USPS was having such a diffiulty of their trays stolen, that they started selling the same trays with the USPS LOGAN, for about 4 dollars.

  10. Gil says:

    Obama gave HOW MANY MILLIONS to Acorn to fund this?
    Anyone remember?

  11. wirenut says:

    How else could someone of this low calibre,( barry) be “ballot stuffed” into such a high office? Humm? Never mind, I just answered my own question.


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