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AP Does Heartwarming Story About Homeless

From the Associated Press:

Tent City homeless residents elect representatives

By WAYNE PARRY | Mon November 05, 2012

LAKEWOOD, N.J. (AP) – … Residents of Tent City, the encampment of homeless people living in the woods of Lakewood, recently held an election to approve rules for the camp, and to elect delegates to represent their interests in dealings with the outside world.

Gregory "Pops" Maple was 1 of 3 Tent City residents chosen to represent the camp. The 62-year-old’s best qualification may be that he’s a great listener.

This is the seventh winter the camp will have experienced, but the first with any regulations.

Seven years.

They include respecting each other and keeping the peace. Drugs and illegal weapons are prohibited. No going into someone else’s tent without their permission.

Issues in the election included who gets the next available heater.

Gee, it sounds like the Occupy Wall Streeters’ and every true blue socialist’s dreams come true.

Meanwhile, in other economic news we have this from The Weekly Standard:

‘U.S. Per Person Debt Now 35 Percent Higher than that of Greece’

By DANIEL HALPER | Mon November 5, 2012

A chart from the Republican side of the Senate Budget Committee shows that "U.S. Per Person Debt [Is] Now 35 Percent Higher than that of Greece." (Above.)

"According to estimates from the International Monetary Fund, America’s total government debt will be $16.8 trillion by the end of the calendar year, compared to $441 billion for Greece," the Republican side of the Senate Budget Committee explains. "On a per person basis, that means U.S. debt is $53,400 for every man, woman, and child, compared to $39,400 for every man, woman, and child in Greece.

The disparity between per capita debt in the U.S. and Greece has grown 40 percent (roughly $8,400) since 2011. Now, U.S. per person debt is 35 percent higher than that of Greece, and is also higher than per capita debt in Portugal, Italy, or Spain (which together with Greece make up the so-called PIGS countries)." …

And this, from CNS News:

4 Yrs at Private College = $130,468; Median-Priced Existing Home = $173,100; U.S. Debt Per American Under 18 = $218,676

By Terence P. Jeffrey | Sun November 4, 2012

(CNSNews.com) - If Americans under the age of 18 were required as a group to pay off the entirety of the federal government’s debt in equal shares, each would now need to pay about $218,676.

That is more than the $130,468 average price tag for four years at a private college or the $173,100 median price for an existing one-family home in the United States.

During the time Barack Obama has been president, the U.S. government debt has increased from approximately $143,255 per American under 18 to approximately $218,676 per American under 18–a climb of $75,421 or about 53 percent…

But don’t worry. When you become homeless you will be able to vote for your local representatives.

This article was posted by Steve Gilbert on Tuesday, November 6th, 2012. Comments are currently closed.

5 Responses to “AP Does Heartwarming Story About Homeless”

  1. canary

    Perhaps we should study this village for the future in Obama is re-elected. I hope they can burn wood when it’s cold.

    • canary

      Oops. I meant to say I hope “we” can gather wood to burn when it’s cold without the tree police imprisoning us.

  2. OTA Mom

    You will not be able to burn anything as EPA rules will prohibit open combustion under air quality rules, even if you could afford the carbon offset credit. So go ahead and lay into that Thanksgiving spread, having a fat layer in the near future will be a GOOD thing.

  3. wirenut

    Remember the good old days, when every citizen only owed 20 grand. Living or dead or unborn? Tent City is a dorm full of wallet-maggots. Living off of, yours, mine, and it is theirs. How heartwarming! Don’t bogart that joint Dude!!!

    You didn’t roll it……Oh my!

  4. P. Aaron

    One supposes that the campaigns will collect cigarette & cigar butts for ‘walkin’ ’round money’.




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