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AP Uses Healthcare Propagandists For Poll

From the shameless liars of the Associated Press:


AP Poll: Many think health overhaul should do more

By Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar And Jennifer Agiesta, Associated Press Writers
September 25, 2010

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul has divided the nation, and Republicans believe their call for repeal will help them win elections in November. But the picture’s not that clear cut.

A new AP poll finds that Americans who think the law should have done more outnumber those who think the government should stay out of health care by 2-to-1…

The poll found that about four in 10 adults think the new law did not go far enough to change the health care system, regardless of whether they support the law, oppose it or remain neutral. On the other side, about one in five say they oppose the law because they think the federal government should not be involved in health care at all.

The AP poll was conducted by Stanford University with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

And this is all you need to know. As we have noted before, these people are longtime fervent agitators for a single payer government run healthcare system.

Behold their ‘mission page’: 

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation – Coverage

By developing policies and programs to expand health coverage and maximize enrollment in existing coverage programs, we are working to ensure that everyone in America has stable, affordable health care coverage.

And they then helpfully spell out how they mean to accomplish this:

Our strategy

Americans’ lack of meaningful access to affordable and stable health care coverage has been a central concern of the Foundation since its inception 35 years ago. 

  • According to the U.S. Census Bureau, today nearly 46 million Americans, including 9 million children, are uninsured, and the problem is growing. 
  • Having a job, even a full-time job, doesn’t necessarily guarantee coverage. In fact, eight out of 10 uninsured Americans are in working families.

In light of an evolving environment and promising opportunities, we are working in several areas to accomplish our goal of ensuring that everyone in America has affordable and stable health care coverage.

Increasing Enrollment in Coverage Programs. Ensuring coverage for all children and low-income adults is a first step toward achieving coverage for everyone.

RWJF has helped make both the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) and Medicaid easier for families to access and understand through our Covering Kids & Families initiative. An estimated seven out of 10 uninsured children are eligible for these programs, and we will continue efforts to ensure that all eligible individuals are enrolled.

Supporting Private/Public Expansions. Increased coverage can be achieved by promoting expansions of coverage in the public and private sectors. This includes encouraging state and federal expansion efforts and encouraging employers and health plans to expand opportunities for private insurance.

We commissioned the State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC), located at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, to develop a comprehensive state-by-state analysis on children’s access to health insurance. This analysis underscores that working parents who earn modest incomes are experiencing dramatic erosion in employer benefits; making it ever harder to obtain adequate health services for themselves and their families. Whose Kids are Covered: A State-by-State Look at Uninsured Children

Maintaining Opinion Leader Support for Expanded Coverage. Because we believe that reaching the goal of affordable and stable health care will require changes in public policy, we will work to build and sustain broad-based support for change. This includes building support among opinion makers, policy-makers, grassroots advocates, the business community and the engaged public.  

Conducting Research and Analysis on Factors that Affect Availability of Affordable, Stable Coverage. We are particularly interested in commissioning, conducting and disseminating innovative research and policy analysis that will reveal the fundamental barriers to achieving affordable and stable health care coverage for all, including the rapidly rising cost of care and the structural features of private health insurance markets. We are now focusing more specifically on states, and are supporting research and evaluation initiatives that will identify the effective coverage strategies that will inform state and federal action.

This is what the AP means by “nonpartisan.”

Maintaining Opinion Leader Support for Expanded Coverage. Because we believe that reaching the goal of affordable and stable health care will require changes in public policy, we will work to build and sustain broad-based support for change. This includes building support among opinion makers, policy-makers, grassroots advocates, the business community and the engaged public. 

And this is why they do push polls.

Conducting Research and Analysis on Factors that Affect Availability of Affordable, Stable Coverage. We are particularly interested in commissioning, conducting and disseminating innovative research and policy analysis that will reveal the fundamental barriers to achieving affordable and stable health care coverage for all, including the rapidly rising cost of care and the structural features of private health insurance markets.

In other words, they are professional propagandists for ‘healthcare reform.’ And yet the AP pretends that they are a reliable polling organization.

What a surprise.

This article was posted by Steve on Saturday, September 25th, 2010. Comments are currently closed.

7 Responses to “AP Uses Healthcare Propagandists For Poll”

  1. proreason says:

    Direct from Moscow U to you.

    Where did they do the polling? Watts? Hyde Park? The New Orleans trailer parks? Hahvad Yahd? Sebbelius’ staff? The Obama’s? Probably all of them.

  2. GetBackJack says:

    They poll whomever they want. Telling me What To Do don’t work. Makes me cranky. I reload when I’m cranky.

  3. finebammer59 says:

    Does the AP have a writer who’s last name is Cooper?

    Or Smith??

    Just askin’.

  4. rightklik says:

    Complete poll here:

    http://surveys.ap.org/data/KnowledgeNetworks/Health%20Reform%20Topline%20for%20Posting.pdf

    The analysis of this poll by the AP, CBS and others was completely bogus … compared apples with potatoes.

    Of the respondents who said either said they supported the bill (30%) or didn’t oppose it or support it (30%), the following question was asked:

    Do you think that the health care law passed last March by Congress should have done more to change the health care system, or do you not think that?

    It should have done more: 61%
    Do not think that: 36%

    So about 36.6% of the people who participated in the survey (61% of the two groups of 30%) wanted a bill that offered “more to change the health care system.” That’s the question that yields the bulk of the responses leading the AP to conclude that “about four in 10 adults think the new law did not go far enough.”

    But “go far enough” were not the words used the the poll. The people participating in the survey were responding to the words “should have done more to change the health care system.” “Go further” and “do more” don’t mean the same thing. But by pushing the “go further” meme, the AP and others (such as CBS) strongly imply that this large minority of Americans who want “more” are asking for a more progressive bill with more goodies and a higher cost.

    For example, shortly after making the assertion that “U.S. Wants More Health Reform, Not Less,” CBS provided this quote:

    “I was disappointed that it didn’t provide universal coverage,” said Bronwyn Bleakley, 35, a biology professor from Easton, Mass.

    It’s very misleading to assert that “do more” actually means “go further” and it’s very dishonest to suggest that “do more” translates to universal coverage. Do those who wish for a bill that could “do more” want bigger reform … or do they want better reform? Do they want a more liberal form of health care reform with universal coverage or do they want a smarter, more conservative form of health care reform with more portability, tort reform, tax credits for individuals (not just for employers), and the freedom to cross state lines with health insurance purchases?

    Another poll from the AP (released on September 16) shows that Americans do NOT think that “bigger” government is better government. Here’s the question:

    If you had to choose, would you favor a smaller government providing fewer services, or a bigger government providing more services?

    “Smaller government with fewer services” was the clear winner with a 17 point lead (57/40).

    CBS warns Republicans against repealing ObamaCare:

    “Republicans are going to have to contend with the 75 percent who want substantial changes in the system,’ said Stanford political science professor Jon Krosnick, who directed the university’s participation.

    “‘Republican legislators’ passion to repeal the legislation is understandable if they are paying attention to members of their own party,’ Krosnick added. ‘But if they want to be responsive to all Americans, there are more Democrats and independents than there are Republicans.'”

    Absolutely wrong!

    As the AP’s own numbers show, if Republicans want to be responsive to the majority of Americans, they’ll fight for less government, not more. A big majority of Americans are calling for a government that provides fewer services. And if lazy Journolistas would dig a little deeper, they’d find that while about 40% of Americans more changes to the health care system (including conservative proposals), an equal number wants no part of the Democrats’ new health care law.

    In the AP/Robert Wood Johnson Poll, the respondents who said either said they opposed the bill (40%) or didn’t oppose it or support it (30%) were asked the following:

    Which of the following best expresses your view of the health care law that Congress passed last March?

    The majority preferred one of two responses:

    I oppose most or all of the changes made by the law 28%
    I oppose the law because I think the federal government should not be involved in health care at all 28%

    So according to this poll, about 40% of Americans (56% of the 70%) think ObamaCare is mostly or all bad. Democrats are going to have to contend with that.

  5. Liberals Demise says:

    Aren’t these the samey-same people that crammed this up our arse for our own good?
    All the while other polls say Americans don’t want socialized medicine at any cost.

    Twist, twist, twist, twist………..spin!

  6. canary says:

    this poll might be possible in regards to months ago when Obama administration announced some new things in the bill that went into effect one day. They didn’t. I mistakenly came across some big ole pro health site and bloggers were all wondering when things were coming into effect, and other bloggers were giving different answers.
    I mentioned something to someone today, certainly not looking for an argument, and I’m telling you I was stunned how little Obama supporters know about the health care bill.


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