« | »

Brewer Bullied Into Vetoing Religious Freedom

From Yahoo News:

Arizona governor vetoes controversial anti-gay, ‘religious freedom’ bill

By Eric Pfeiffer | February 26, 2014

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer announced that she has vetoed a bill that would have allowed state businesses to discriminate against gay and lesbian customers. “The bill is broadly worded and could result in unintended and negative consequences," Brewer told reporters at a press conference on Wednesday.

You know, you could actually say the same thing about the first amendment. Which protects religious freedom. — Or, rather, it used to.

By the way, note how Yahoo News put scare quotes around ‘religious freedom,’ and not ‘anti gay.’

"After weighing all of the arguments I have vetoed Senate Bill 1062 moments ago.” Brewer made her remarks during a press conference announced with little notice on Wednesday evening.

Despite the short notice, a large crowd of demonstrators quickly gathered outside the state capital in Phoenix before Brewer made her remarks. The crowd of demonstrators erupted into cheers after Brewer’s announcement…

But there was no bullying. The left never tries to bully anyone to get their way. Just ask Gov. Scott Walker.

Despite herself being conservative Republican lawmaker, Brewer used her remarks to criticize the state Senate for making the religious freedom bill a priority over other concerns…

“This is the first policy bill to cross my desk,” Brewer said. “It does not address a specific concern related to Arizona. I have not heard one example where a business owner’s liberty has been put into jeopardy.” …

Did she mean in Arizona? Or has she never heard that the owners of the Masterpiece Cakeshop in Colorado faced jail time for declining such a request. As did a photographer in New Mexico.

Brewer said she had previously instructed state lawmakers that “passing a responsible budget that continues Arizona’s economic comeback,” should be the legislature’s top priority…

There is always a more important priority. Though it’s hard to see how a budget should trump a civil right enumerated in the Constitution.

“Religious liberty is a core American and Arizona value. So is nondiscrimination,” Brewer said…

In reality, all SB 1062 did was clarify Arizona’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Which is a law that has been on the books for 15 years. And Arizona’s law was itself based on the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993. Which was passed by Congress with large bipartisan majorities. In fact, it was championed by Ted Kennedy, and signed into law by Bill Clinton.

So if SB 1062 is discriminatory, so is federal law. If Arizonans are bigoted homophobes, so was Ted Kennedy and Bill Clinton.

By the way, in addition to the federal government, 18 other states have statutes that are practically identical to Arizona’s. And a dozen more interpret their state constitutions as providing the same protections to businesses. So there is a lot of bigotry going on unnoticed across the fruited plain.

Lastly, for the record, the two page Arizona religious liberty bill never once mentioned or same-sex marriage or homosexuals. It is not anti-gay. It simply sought to protect religious liberty. Which, by the way, is a real civil right. A civil right that is even enumerated in the First Amendment of our Constitution.

But, thank Gaia, this is all behind us now. And now Jan Brewer will be loved. (Though probably not re-elected.) And now the GOP will be seen as tolerant. — But what will be the next soap storyline?

This article was posted by Steve Gilbert on Thursday, February 27th, 2014. Comments are currently closed.

3 Responses to “Brewer Bullied Into Vetoing Religious Freedom”

  1. I am not ONE IOTA surprised she vetoed it. When I first heard that she had 5 days to veto it, I thought to myself, “She has caved on major issues before, she will easily cave in on this one.”

    However, here is the alternative no one has the stomach for:
    1. Allow the NFL to leave Arizona, and their Super Bowl, and eliminate Martin Luther King day as a recognized state holiday (which was the last threat the NFL issued to Arizona).

    2. Fight the good fight in the state capital as best they can until they figure out liberal judges and the federal government will not allow them to exercise their own freedoms.

    3. Start identifying all those people (names and addresses) who sue, or block state laws from taking effect, and “encourage” them to leave the state.

    4. Eventual armed conflict.

    5. Vote for secession.

    6. Fight for secession.

    7. Encourage and ally with other states that secede.

    That’s the only way Arizona will free themselves to protect their own borders, eliminate Obamacare, protect religious freedom, protect gun rights. NO POLITICIAN has the guts to go down that road, and the populace owns a fairly pampered existence as well. Only when things are so rotten, that dying for freedom is better than living under tyranny will people get off the sofa, but by that time, it will be far too late.

    • Petronius

      Ah, secession . . . or what I like to think of as “government of the people, by the people, and for the people.”

      The Union is not supposed to be a prison.

      The Federal government exits (or is supposed to exist) for the good of the States; the States don’t exist for the Federal government. The Federal government derives its existence from the consent of the individual States. No State ever surrendered its sovereignty, not before and not after Appomattox.

      Yes, like it or not, know it or not, accept it or not, emphatically yes, States do have the right to secede. The Union is not supposed to be an excuse for half the States to murder, subjugate, burn, rob, and impoverish the other half of the States. The Union is not supposed to be like the mafia, where, if you decide to leave, they take you out to a landfill in New Jersey and beat you to death.

  2. Sometimes, not doing anything is the right thing to do.

    As in letting the Bill languish on a desk .. languish .. languish ..




« Front Page | To Top
« | »