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DOD Shows Video Of Afghan Border Attack

As we noted a couple of days ago, the new (pro-terrorist) Pakistani government has accused the US of "cowardly" attacking and killing eleven of its "para-military" soldiers who were positioned on Pakistan’s border with Afghanistan.

Unfortunately for these claimants and their fellow travelers in our media it would appear that the entire incident was videotaped by an unmanned drone. And, according to the video, no such attack occurred.

Surprisingly, this minor detail has been reported (after a fashion) by the Associated Press. Though it would seem only in this video clip and not in any print reports as yet:

 

More typical, however, is this report from Reuters, which manages to bury this exculpatory news deep in this article applauding the Pakistani’s outrage:

Pakistani tribes reach for guns after U.S. attack

By Khalid Nisar

GHALANAI, Pakistan (Reuters) – Fiercely independent tribesmen, angered by a U.S. air strike that killed 11 Pakistani soldiers this week, vowed to raise a militia to help Pakistan’s army defend the border with Afghanistan.

Pakistan, a staunch ally in the U.S.-led war on terrorism, denounced Tuesday’s attack on a border post in the Mohmand tribal region as "unprovoked and cowardly" and said it could undermine the cooperation in the battle against al Qaeda and the Taliban.

Elders from ethnic Pashtun tribes in Mohmand, one of seven semi-autonomous tribal regions, issued a statement late on Thursday condemning the attack as "naked aggression" and said they were ready to raise a "lashkar," or army.

"It’s the duty of the government to protect and defend the frontiers and we are ready to raise a lashkar to help our army in their cause," the elders said.

"We are ready to fight for our homeland as we fought in Kashmir in 1948," they said, referring to the first war between Pakistan and India, a year after their partition.

Chanting slogans of "Down with America" and "Down with Bush," about 250 activists of an Islamic group paraded on the roads of Ghalanai, Mohmand’s main town, to protest against the attack.

"We should wage jihad (Muslim holy war) to teach a lesson to America for this aggression," imam of the main mosque of Ghalanai, Abdul Khaliq, told the crowd.

The soldiers killed were manning a border post about 35 km (22 miles) northwest of Ghalanai.

U.S.-led ground forces from across the border in the eastern Afghan province of Kunar called for air support after coming under small-arms and rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) fire from militants occupying a ridge 200 meters (yards) inside Pakistan.

A video released by U.S. authorities showed footage of the encounter shot by a reconnaissance drone aircraft, complete with a voice-over describing the incident.

The video was posted on the internet site

http://www.dvidshub.net/media/video/0806/DOD_100020431.wmv.

The blurred, grainy images showed between five and seven figures scurrying among the rocks along the ridge, and flashes of gunfire and from RPGs, according to the American commentary.

In the final sequences, four precision bombs were shown exploding, but the commentator asserted that no military structure or posts were in the impact areas.

The U.S. military said the operation was coordinated with Pakistan and the Pentagon defended U.S. forces, saying initial indications pointed to a "legitimate strike" carried out in self-defense after they came under attack.

Pakistan contested the U.S. version and issued a protest…

Also note the photo that Reuters is running with their article:

Tribesmen sift through the rubble of a residential structure ...

Tribesmen sift through the rubble of a residential structure after an air strike by U.S. forces in the Sheikh Baba area of Mohamand region at the Pakistan-Afghan border June 11, 2008.

Of course they side with the terrorists. They are their allies.

This article was posted by Steve on Friday, June 13th, 2008. Comments are currently closed.

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