« | »

Gore Gets US Eavesdropping Laws All Wrong

Al Gore calls for something that no longer exists, for a situation where no law has been broken.

In fact the imagined "crime" is something that Gore’s boss and every other President has done since the FISA laws were enacted.

All in all, quite a sad performance by the man who would be President.

From his fellow terrorist enablers at Reuters:

Gore calls for special counsel on eavesdropping

Mon Jan 16, 2006 3:05 PM ET
By Tabassum Zakaria

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Former Vice President Al Gore called on Monday for an independent counsel to investigate whether President George W. Bush broke the law in authorizing domestic eavesdropping without court approval.

U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales plans to testify in Senate hearings, expected next month, to give the administration’s legal justification for the secret domestic eavesdropping operation.

"A special counsel should be immediately appointed by the attorney general to remedy the obvious conflict of interest that prevents him from investigating what many believe are serious violations of law by the president," Gore said in a speech to The American Constitution Society and The Liberty Coalition.

Gore, the Democrat defeated by Bush in the 2000 presidential election, said the eavesdropping operation threatened the foundation of U.S. democracy, and he recalled the FBI’s secret surveillance of Martin Luther King, on the U.S. holiday commemorating the civil rights leader.

Gore’s comments also come at the start of a congressional election year in which Democrats are seeking to seize majority control from Republicans.

He accused Bush of breaking the law for not getting court approval for the National Security Agency eavesdropping operation on communications such as phone calls and e-mail coming into and going out of the United States of people suspected of terrorism ties.

"We still have much to learn about the NSA’s domestic surveillance. What we do know about this pervasive wiretapping virtually compels the conclusion that the president of the United States has been breaking the law repeatedly and insistently," Gore said.

"A president who breaks the law is a threat to the very structure of our government," he said.

The 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act makes it illegal to spy on U.S. citizens in the United States without the approval of a special, secret court.

Bush has steadfastly said his actions were within the law and that he ordered the domestic eavesdropping operation to fight terrorism after the September 11 attacks.

"Al Gore’s incessant need to insert himself in the headline of the day is almost as glaring as his lack of understanding of the threats facing America," Tracey Schmitt, spokeswoman for the Republican National Committee, said in a statement.

"While the president works to protect Americans from terrorists, Democrats deliver no solutions of their own, only diatribes laden with inaccuracies and anger," she said.

Lying to a Grand Jury under oath, as well as lying to Federal investigators, and suborning perjury — those are crimes.

As a matter of fact, it was in one of Clinton’s rare moments of legality, that he issued an Executive Order that allowed for intelligence collection without a FISA warrant:

[Executive Orders]


[Federal Register page and date: 60 FR 8169; February 13, 1995]

                            THE WHITE HOUSE

                     Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release                                   February 9, 1995

                        EXECUTIVE ORDER 12949

                            – – – – – – -
               FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE PHYSICAL SEARCHES

       By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution
and the laws of the United States, including sections 302 and 303 of the
Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 ("Act") (50 U.S.C.  1801,
et seq.), as amended by Public Law 103- 359, and in order to provide for
the authorization of physical searches for foreign intelligence purposes
as set forth in the Act, it is hereby ordered as follows:

       Section 1.  Pursuant to section 302(a)(1) of the Act, the
Attorney General is authorized to approve physical searches, without a
court order
, to acquire foreign intelligence information for periods of
up to one year, if the Attorney General makes the certifications
required by that section.

       Sec. 2.  Pursuant to section 302(b) of the Act, the Attorney
General is authorized to approve applications to the Foreign
Intelligence Surveillance Court under section 303 of the Act to obtain
orders for physical searches for the purpose of collecting foreign
intelligence information.

       Sec. 3.  Pursuant to section 303(a)(7) of the Act, the following
officials, each of whom is employed in the area of national security or
defense, is designated to make the certifications required by section
303(a)(7) of the Act in support of applications to conduct physical
searches:

       (a) Secretary of State;

       (b) Secretary of Defense;

       (c) Director of Central Intelligence;

       (d) Director of the Federal Bureau of
  Investigation;

       (e) Deputy Secretary of State;

       (f) Deputy Secretary of Defense; and

       (g) Deputy Director of Central Intelligence.

       None of the above officials, nor anyone officially acting in that
capacity, may exercise the authority to make the above certifications,
unless that official has been appointed by the President, by and with
the advice and consent of the Senate.

                         WILLIAM J. CLINTON

  THE WHITE HOUSE,
      February 9, 1995.

Sadly, Vice President Al Gore must have had too much iced tea that day, and missed all of this.

Some kind soul should tell this out-of-touch gentleman that the Independent Counsel Act was allowed to expire six years ago.

While they are at it, they should remind Mr. Gore that Martin Luther King, Jr. was wiretapped at the behest of that liberal Democrat icon, Robert F. Kennedy.

This article was posted by Steve Gilbert on Monday, January 16th, 2006. Comments are currently closed.

27 Responses to “Gore Gets US Eavesdropping Laws All Wrong”

Sorry, comments for this entry are closed at this time.


« Front Page | To Top
« | »