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WP: Not Enough Illegal Aliens In Texas

From the open borders lobby at the Washington Post:

In Texas, Frustration Over Senate Impasse

Collapse of Immigration Bill Concerns Region That Relies on Foreign Workers

By Sylvia Moreno
Monday, June 11, 2007; Page A10

WESLACO, Tex. — On the front line of securing the nation’s borders, the day after the collapse of a major overhaul of the nation’s immigration laws was business as usual — but better…

The bipartisan Senate measure that stalled late last week would have, once again, tightened border security, cracked down on the hiring of illegal immigrants and provided a path for such immigrants to stay and work legally in the United States. The legislation died when the Senate voted to end a new guest-worker program after five years.

The bill, and in particular the proposal for the guest-worker program, were watched closely by South Texans. Many of them are worried about labor shortages in the service industry and in the region’s multibillion-dollar produce industry.

“If we cannot get labor in this country because Congress is incapable of passing intelligent legislation, some people will struggle along, some will go out of business, and many will move production to Mexico,” said Texas Produce Association President John McClung of Alamo, in South Texas.

Already, 50 percent of Texas fruit and vegetable distributors contract with Mexican farmers across the border to plant and harvest produce that is then shipped across the United States, he said.

“People have to understand that a significant amount of fruits and vegetables is going to be planted and tended and harvested by Mexicans,” McClung said. “The question is only what side of the border is that going to happen on.”

J Allen Carnes, whose family has farmed fruit and vegetables on 3,000 acres for more than half a century in Uvalde, in southwest Texas, said the company has traditionally depended on Mexican fieldworkers with various forms of legal work visas.

But recent security crackdowns have made it more difficult for those workers to cross the border or travel within the region. And fewer migrant workers from South Texas are coming up, for fear of immigration enforcement raids, Carnes said.

Last year the Carnes farm had to leave produce unpicked in the field for the first time because of a 20 to 30 percent shortage of farmhands. This year, the labor shortage is 40 to 50 percent, Carnes said…

The bill’s collapse in the Senate “was pretty disheartening,” Carnes said. “This country has a real problem when it can’t fix its problem.” …

We are told by the Washington Post that:

1) Enforcement doesn’t stop the flow of illegal aliens.

2) There aren’t enough illegal aliens to pick the crops.

Which is it?

We are also told by the growers who want slave labor:

Already, 50 percent of Texas fruit and vegetable distributors contract with Mexican farmers across the border to plant and harvest produce that is then shipped across the United States, he said.

But if the illegal aliens in the US are made legal and given minimum wage it will be far cheaper to grow produce in Mexico than in the US.

So how is this an argument for the amnesty legislation?

Apparently, neither logic or even consistency apply when you are driving an agenda.

This article was posted by Steve on Monday, June 11th, 2007. Comments are currently closed.

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