« | »

Iran To Build Ten New Enrichment Plants

From Iran’s Press TV:

A Russian technician walks inside the Reactor building of the Bushehr nuclear power plant, in southern Iran in 2006.

Iran set to construct ten new enrichment plants

Sun, 29 Nov 2009

Days after a new resolution by the UN nuclear watchdog called on Iran to halt the construction of its Fordo enrichment plant, the Iranian government tasks the Atomic Energy Organization (AEO) with building ten more nuclear enrichment sites.

According to the government of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the AEO should begin the construction of five of the requested enrichment facilities over the next two months.

Upon the Iranian government’s request, the organization should also propose locations for the remaining five enrichment plants within a two-month period.

According to the report published on the Iranian president’s website, the request for the construction of the new sites comes as the Iranian government is expected to provide the country’s power plants with 20,000 megawatts of electricity for domestic use.

The decision, which was made during a Sunday cabinet meeting, comes as President Ahmadinejad argued that the country is in need of 500,000 centrifuges for generating the cited amount of electricity.

The requested nuclear sites are expected to be as large as Iran’s enrichment facility in the central city of Natanz.

The announcement by Iran comes as earlier in the week six world powers drafted a resolution at the UN nuclear watchdog against Iran’s nuclear work.

The draft, backed by the United States, Germany, France, Britain, Russia and China, was presented at the year-end meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) 35-nation Board of Governors.

The IAEA passed the resolution which called on Iran to stop all construction work at Fordo and confirm there are no more nuclear sites that the agency must be aware of.

Iran says the demand to stop construction at Fordo is not within the framework of its legal obligations.

Meanwhile, Iranian authorities have rejected the notion that the newly-adopted resolution is much stronger than the previous ones, arguing that the past resolutions called for a complete halt to Iran’s nuclear enrichment program while the latest resolution seeks to pressure Iran into abandoning construction at the Fordo plant.

Meanwhile, also from Iran’s Press TV:

Iran’s Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki (L) shakes hands with Russian Energy Minister Sergei Shmatko before an official meeting in Tehran.

Iran, Russia begin joint economic session

Sun, 29 Nov 2009

Iran and Russia have kicked off a summit of the countries’ joint energy commission with the establishment of a joint oil firm and a gas swap deal topping the agenda.

Russian Energy Minister Sergey Shmatko arrived in Tehran on Sunday to attend the two-day summit.

The summit aims to discuss details of an agreement for swapping gas from Central Asia to the Persian Gulf; the setting up of a joint venture for energy projects in the two countries as well as third-party states; and the joint exploration and development of oil and gas fields.

The agreement was signed between Shmatko and Iranian Oil Minister Gholam-Hossein Nozari on the sidelines of an OPEC summit in March.

Swaps are agreements by which a country can supply goods to another in exchange for the latter giving the equivalent to a third party.

Tehran and Moscow plan to swap up to 50 million cubic meters of Iran’s natural gas from the Caspian Sea to the Persian Gulf.

Shmatko is also expected to discuss with Tehran officials the long-delayed Bushehr nuclear plant in the southern Iran.

The Bushehr plant was originally scheduled to be completed in 1999 but its completion has repeatedly been delayed.

Russia has recently announced the nuclear plant would not become operational, as promised, by the end of 2009.

Russia has cited “technical” issues as the reason for the delays, ruling out any political motivation in the matter.

In a meeting with Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki earlier on Sunday, the Russian energy minister said Moscow’s policy towards Tehran would not change, saying his country is seeking “long-term relations” with Iran.

Aren’t we glad we pushed the ‘reset button’ with the Soviet Union Russia?

They are so helpful now.

This article was posted by Steve on Sunday, November 29th, 2009. Comments are currently closed.

6 Responses to “Iran To Build Ten New Enrichment Plants”

  1. proreason says:

    How’s that Hopenchange working out for ya?

  2. Rusty Shackleford says:

    Russia and Iran?

    Shoot, they deserve one another. Should be an endless source of dark comedy.

  3. Helena says:

    Now the Iranians are saying it’s all our fault.

    BBC News – Iran accuses West of provoking new nuclear sites move
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/8385797.stm

    “We had no intention of building many facilities like the Natanz site, but apparently the West doesn’t want to understand Iran’s peaceful message”
    Ali Akbar Salehi
    Iranian vice-president

  4. beautyofreason says:

    Well, the Russians and Iranians are really milking Obama’s appeasement to the limit. Giving up that missile defense system in Poland has really made Russia love us.

  5. October 1, 2009
    Tough talk getting results:-
    Exerpts:

    The president warned Iran that “talk is no substitute for action” and that “our patience is not unlimited.”

    “We’re not interested in talking for the sake of talking,” Obama said.

    Echoed by Hillary: “I will count it as a positive sign when it moves from gestures and engagements to actions and results,” Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said after talks concluded on Thursday. “That’s a necessary pathway and I think we’re on it. We’ve always said we would engage. But we’re not talking for the sake of talking.”

    While not laying out a timeline for the next round of talks, State Department spokesman Ian Kelly told reporters Thursday that “Iran informed the P-5-plus-1 that it plans to cooperate fully and immediately with the IAEA on the new enrichment facility near Qom and will invite IAEA experts to come in the next few weeks.”

    ——————————————————————————————————————————
    http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/61217-obama-iran-meetings-constructive-beginning-two-weeks-allowed-for-nuclear-inspections

    By Sam Youngman and Bridget Johnson – 10/01/09 02:52 PM ET
    President Barack Obama said Thursday that the Iranian government must allow the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) full and unfettered access to a recently unveiled underground uranium enrichment plant in two weeks.

    Obama, speaking in the White House Diplomatic Room, said that meetings between U.S. and Iranian officials and other diplomatic partners in Geneva are a “constructive beginning” as the countries have entered into “intensive” negotiations.

    Obama said the international community is unified in expecting swift action from Iran in building confidence that the country is pursuing a nuclear program only for peaceful means.

    “In pursuit of that goal, today’s meeting was a constructive beginning, but it must be followed with constructive action by the Iranian government,” Obama said.

    Iran met with the five permanent members of the Security Council plus Germany in Switzerland on Thursday, emerging with an agreement to meet for further discussions this month. Undersecretary of State William Burns sat down for a rare bilateral meeting with Saeed Jalili, chief of Iran’s National Security Council.

    Iran is being asked to offer unfettered access to the nuclear processing site at Qom, and to take steps to prove that its nuclear program is for peaceful energy purposes, as the Islamic Republic has long claimed. A second round of talks is planned for the end of this month, and if the steps are not met then, the threat of sanctions will take a greater role in negotiations.

    “I will count it as a positive sign when it moves from gestures and engagements to actions and results,” Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said after talks concluded on Thursday. “That’s a necessary pathway and I think we’re on it. We’ve always said we would engage. But we’re not talking for the sake of talking.”

    The president warned Iran that “talk is no substitute for action” and that “our patience is not unlimited.”

    “We’re not interested in talking for the sake of talking,” Obama said.

    The U.S., joined by England and France, disclosed evidence of the underground facility to the IAEA last week after Iranian officials, aware that the facility had been discovered, also disclosed the existence of the site.

    Obama, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and French President Nicolas Sarkozy, speaking at the G-20 summit in Pittsburgh, warned Iranian officials that refusal to allow the IAEA to inspect the facility would likely result in increased sanctions.

    In his weekly radio address Saturday, Obama again pressed evidence of the facility and said the country must change course on its nuclear ambitions or “face consequences.”

    “Iran’s leaders must now choose — they can live up to their responsibilities and achieve integration with the community of nations, or they will face increased pressure and isolation, and deny opportunity to their own people,” Obama said.

    On Thursday, White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said the negotiations still have a long way to go, but the president and America’s negotiating partners will not allow the Iranians to run out the clock while developing nuclear-weapon capabilities.

    “If at any point this appears to simply be the Iranians trying to talk some issue to death, then I think, working in concert with and common purpose with our P-5-plus-1 partners, we’ll take additional steps to ensure that Iran knows we mean business,” Gibbs said.

    Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman John Kerry (D-Mass.) acknowledged in an editorial in the Financial Times on Thursday that diplomatic engagement may fail, but still remains the best course in dealing with the Islamic Republic.

    “We must be willing to take yes for an answer,” Kerry wrote. “An important lesson of Iraq is that intrusive inspections can work. Our ability to detect and monitor the Qom enrichment facility for years before publicly revealing it is encouraging. One objective should be a more expansive inspections and monitoring regime to prevent Iran from diverting nuclear material to a ‘break-out’ military program.”

    Kerry encouraged economic measures that could be enacted, aside from “the most potent pressure” of Security Council sanctions.

    While not laying out a timeline for the next round of talks, State Department spokesman Ian Kelly told reporters Thursday that “Iran informed the P-5-plus-1 that it plans to cooperate fully and immediately with the IAEA on the new enrichment facility near Qom and will invite IAEA experts to come in the next few weeks.”

    Kelly confirmed that it was “agreed in principle in consultations with the IAEA … that low-enriched uranium produced in Iran will be transported to third countries for further enrichment and fabrication into fuel assemblies.” Numerous media reports indicated that Russia was offering to enrich Iran’s uranium stocks for what the Islamic Republic terms medical purposes.


« Front Page | To Top
« | »