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Hillary Lies About Idolizing MLK, Jr – Again

From her fans at ABC News:

Hillary and Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, and other Democrat hacks and race baiters “march” in Selma, March 4, 2007.

SNEAK PEEK: ‘Shuck & Jive’

Clinton Explains Himself to Sharpton

By TEDDY DAVIS, TALAL AL-KHATIB and MIKE ELMORE

January 11, 2008—The Clintons defended themselves Friday against charges of racial insensitivity towards Democratic rival Barack Obama.

“Well, I think its regrettable because both of these accusations are baseless and divisive and any fair reading of what both of us said would be clear and I think it’s regrettable that these are being in a way used to try to divide people in our country during this election and I’m not going to have any part of it,” Clinton told ABC News. “I personally find it offensive.”

“You know,” she continued, “I was inspired by Dr. King when I was a young girl. I considered him one of my heroes, a global symbol, an icon of everything that is the best about America and he worked his entire life to make the changes that we enjoy today so I hope that this kind of unfortunate political activity really just ceases because I don’t think this is what we want this election to be about.”

Clinton made her comments to ABC’s Eloise Harper while campaigning in East Los Angeles, Calif. She was asked if comments she made about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and remarks her husband made about Obama receiving “fairy-tale” treatment from the press might hurt her standing with African Americans.

While the former first lady was defending herself in California, her husband was explaining himself to the Rev. Al Sharpton.

“It’s not a fairy tale; he might win,” said Clinton. “I think he’s a very impressive man, and he’s run a great campaign.”

Clinton is under fire for using the words “fairy tale” in connection with Obama. South Carolina Rep. Jim Clyburn told Friday’s New York Times that he saw the remark as a slap at the image of a black candidate running on a theme of unity and optimism. Clyburn is now reconsidering his neutral stance in South Carolina’s Jan. 26 Democratic primary.

The former president explained to Sharpton that his comment was not a swipe at Obama reaching for the White House but rather a reference to the fawning press treatment Obama has received

What liars these Clintons be.

But as usual, Bill’s lies are so blatant that they hardly need to be explained. All anyone has to do is read the context of his “fairy tale” remarks. He was griping about Barack Obama’s “judgment.”

However, Hillary is just as mendacious, perhaps even more so at least in this instance:

“You know,” she continued, “I was inspired by Dr. King when I was a young girl. I considered him one of my heroes, a global symbol, an icon of everything that is the best about America and he worked his entire life to make the changes that we enjoy today so I hope that this kind of unfortunate political activity really just ceases because I don’t think this is what we want this election to be about.”

Indeed, she trots out variations on this theme at every opportunity:

“As a young girl, I had the great privilege of hearing Dr. King speak in Chicago. The year was 1963. My youth minister from our church took a few of us down on a cold January night to hear someone that we had read about, we had watched on television, we had seen with our own eyes from a distance, this phenomenon known as Dr. King. He titled the sermon he gave that night “Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution.” — Hillary Clinton, March 4, 2007, on the 42nd anniversary of Bloody Sunday in Selma.

This amazing brush with history has been featured prominently in Hillary’s ghostwritten autobiography and all of the other hagiographies written about her, where it is uniformly presented as a watershed moment in her young life.

However, despite her various recollections of the event, the young Diane Rodham (as she called herself then) went to hear Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 15, 1962.

But far more importantly, it would appear that Mr. King didn’t make much of an impression on herself at all. Since after having had that supposedly life-changing moment, young Diane went on to become a “Goldwater Girl” and to campaign door to door for her candidate throughout the fall of 1964.

Unfortunately for the Hillary mythos, as I have mentioned elsewhere, her hero Mr. Goldwater was adamantly opposed to the passage of the Civil Right Act of 1964, which of course was Mr. King’s primary cause at the time.

Indeed, Mr. Goldwater was one of the few Republicans who opposed the measure. And his opposition to it was one of the foremost issues of the campaign. 

So it is quite appalling to hear Mrs. Clinton now pretend, as she so often does, to have been so deeply and forever moved by the experience of having heard Mr. King speak.

That’s the real fairy tale here. But no one will bother to report it.

After all, what’s another lie from the Clintons?

This article was posted by Steve on Friday, January 11th, 2008. Comments are currently closed.

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