« | »

Newsweek Reporter Confesses In Iran

From Iran’s Press TV:

Maziar Bahari

Detained Newsweek reporter comes clean

Wed, 01 Jul 2009

Newsweek’s Canadian-Iranian journalist Maziar Bahari has admitted to giving “false and biased” reports about the recent post-election events in Iran.

Bahari, who also had connections with the BBC and Britain’s Channel 4 news, was arrested in Tehran during the unrest that followed the announcement of the result of the 10th presidential election.

In a Tuesday press conference that was held while he was still in custody, Bahari explained the nature of some of his activities in Iran over the past years and the role that Western media had played in the events, which unfolded in the country.

“Most of the work I did for BBC and Channel 4 had to do with highlighting problems in various areas… the journalist work I did revolved around daily news and issues such as the parliamentary and presidential elections,” Bahari told reports.

Western media are an inseparable part of the capitalist machine of Western liberal democracies. A Western journalist who comes to Iran… is mainly concerned with the interests of the West, which are defined in relation to each issue at every period of time,” he said.

The Newsweek reporter said international press set the scenes for velvet revolutions in various countries, adding that the gentle overthrow of a government could not be achieved without their critical role.

Bahari specifically highlighted the role of the BBC, CNN, Euronews, The New York Times and Newsweek.

“On the brink of every velvet revolution Western media try to portray the ruling administration as the traditional, bigoted, inefficient and undemocratic side while introducing the Western-inclined trend as a modern, efficient, democratic, and reformist movement that has support among the people,” he said.

Bahar said that in such cases, several months prior to the vote foreign news outlets begin efforts to persuade the public that the election will be rigged and that a coup is just around the corner.

He added that these media outlets give full coverage to illegal protests with the belief that broadcasting such events will help enlarge their scale.

The announcement of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s re-election sparked opposition rallies in the capital Tehran with defeated candidates Mir-Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi demanding the vote to be annulled.

Iran has blamed the ‘biased’ attitude of European countries and their media for fueling the country’s post-election unrest.

Newsweek has issued a statement about Bahari’s arrest and called for his immediate release, saying that the journalist’s “coverage of Iran, for Newsweek and other outlets, has always been fair and nuanced, and has given full weight to all sides of the issues.”

“He has always worked well with different administrations in Tehran, including the current one,” the statement says.

This is a perfect example of how insular the Iranian regime has become.

If they imagine that an employee of Newsweek/Washington Post would have anything but genuine admiration for a dictatorial regime that is rabidly anti-American, they have to be completely out of touch with the outside world.

Of course Mr. Bahan was simply saying what he thought the people in power wanted him to say.

That, after all, is his job. What he has been trained all of his life to do.

This article was posted by Steve on Wednesday, July 1st, 2009. Comments are currently closed.

8 Responses to “Newsweek Reporter Confesses In Iran”

  1. Liberals Demise says:

    He was water boarded………..how many times for this response?

  2. GetBackJack says:

    Well, gee … he was working for Newsweak.

    Of course he confessed. They don’t call it Newsweak for nothing.

  3. pdsand says:

    He told the truth, he was just talking about Newsweek’s subvervise activities in the U.S., not Iran.

  4. tranquil.night says:

    From the horses mouth, what happens when journalism becomes about reporting a premise rather than reporting the truth? Epic fail.

  5. Reality Bytes says:

    Gasp! What about the Geneva Conventions?!

    Is it me or were these conventions, the ones in Geneva, filled with diplomats & strippers tossing water filled condoms out hotel windows, cause from where I sit they don’t seem to be taken very seriously anymore & probably weren’t then either.

  6. MinnesotaRush says:

    Do ya s’pose he’ll be able to ‘keep his head’??? With all the pressure ya’ know.

    In actuality, God bless them and their families. Their current situation could become very ‘tentative'(???).

  7. neocon mom says:

    I think he won’t be subjected to the worst that Iranian detention has to offer. They are making an example of him. If they call attention to him then they’ll probably release him in one piece, kind of like what they did with Sabieri. He’ll gladly never set foot in Iran again, it will have the intended effect on Newsweek, which will never attempt to make Iran look bad in print again (Fareed Zakaria is already a top notch apologist for Islamists.)

    Anytime I see a western journalist detained by Islamic fundamentalists is a good occasion to recall the life of Daniel Pearl and this piece by his father in the WSJ:
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123362422088941893.html

    • beautyofreason says:

      Thank you, neocon mom. That was a beautiful article, though painful to read. The left brings out its anti-American roots each time they defend Islamic murderers as “freedom fighters” and victims of Western “imperialism” in their relativistic, multicultural point of view. In their mind evil is just a concept that wavers in every cultural and religious context. Terrorism is supposedly justifiable if it is a response to the West, and sanctified by a cultural or religious framework (especially in Islam). The liberals keep an anthropological distance in everything – no value is absolute.

      The world seems upside down these days and I hate to read the news because it is depressing. Articles such as the one you posted help me to stay optimistic. Thank you.


« Front Page | To Top
« | »