« | »

Newsweek: Terrorists – Nothing In Common

From those defenders of the faith at Newsweek:

Who Are the Bombers?

In spite of the stereotypes, there is no typical suicide bomber. A look at those who believed they would find paradise by sending others to their deaths.

By Rod Nordland and Babak Dehghanpisheh

Aug. 5, 2007 – Sajida Arishawy is in a Jordanian jail now, singing English pop tunes to herself as she waits in solitary confinement to see if her death sentence is carried out.  Her lawyer calls her “the bride of Al Qaeda,” the woman who married another terrorist so they could travel together legally under Islamic law. Their honeymoon plans: blow up a Jordanian wedding party…

Those plans succeeded with devastating effect. Arishawy and her husband, both Iraqis, were among four bombers who came to Jordan to blow up three hotels in Amman in the Nov. 2005 attack that would take 57 lives…

Suicide bombers don’t fall into easy categories. Like most stereotypes, the one that they are usually impoverished, disaffected young men with few prospects is often, but not always, true.

If you’re living in hell, why not go to paradise,” says Saif al din Ali Ahmed, chief of security for the Kurdish regional government in Suleimaniya, explaining what might prompt Iraqis to take up arms.

But women like Arishawy are more than the exception that prove the rule. “They [insurgent leaders] are getting very well-off people with great potential to carry out attacks,” says Hadi Ameri, head of the security committee in the Iraqi Parliament…

Didar Khalid was one of the dimmer perpetrators. A would-be bomber wearing a suicide vest, he approached a group of policemen in the northern Iraqi city of Kirkuk, in 2004. Seeing him wearing an overcoat on a hot day, one of the officers pointed his gun at him and shouted, “Put up your hands”, and he did. The cops quickly grabbed his arms before he could push the button. Khalid’s arrest led authorities there to roll up the bomber’s entire cell, nine members who included finance, explosives, indoctrination and surveillance experts..

At a higher end of the intelligence scale was Ahmed Said Ahmed al-Ghamdi, 20, a medical student in the Sudan, whose father was reportedly a Saudi diplomat. Al-Ghamdi was identified by the international Arabic al-Sharq al-Awsat newspaper as the suicide bomber who blew himself up in the middle of the mess hall at a U.S. military base in Mosul, killing 22, most of them U.S. servicemen — the single biggest loss of American life on a military base

Ahmed Rawi, 30, was an Iraqi teacher in Fallujah and a father of two… But by their yardstick, Ahmed may have sold his life cheaply; only one death, that of a Marine, was reported in Fallujah that day.

Bilal Ahmed, 22, was considered a typical Iraqi college student and a football fanatic..

Bilal too sold his life cheaply.  His attack on a police station—most Iraqi police are Shia—succeeded only in killing two innocent bystanders and no cops.

Attitudes were strikingly different in the family of an Iraqi woman suicide bomber, Muna (her family requested that their names be changed as a condition of speaking frankly), a 23-year-old medical student…

One day she asked her parents for approval to carry out a “martyrdom operation.”  Her father simply walked out of the room; her mother consented. “I wish I would have seen her wedding, but she chose her way and we did not object,” says her mother, Fatima. “We believe Allah has taken her to paradise.” Her attack apparently killed one U.S. soldier and three Iraqi civilians in Fallujah on Nov. 25, 2006.

For Raed al Bena, 30, a Jordanian who blew himself up somewhere in Iraq, the grudge was very personal—and very petty…

It’s unclear where Raed died; those who called said he had been martyred in Mosul, but no successful suicide operations were reported there during that period. Some officials think he was the suicide bomber who killed 123 civilians in Hilla around that time…

What a repellent story, in so many ways.

Suicide bombers don’t fall into easy categories. Like most stereotypes, the one that they are usually impoverished, disaffected young men with few prospects is often, but not always, true.

Who makes this preposterous claim except for the terrorist apologists in the Western media?

Most people have cottoned on long ago that these terrorists are not all “impoverished, disaffected young men with few prospects.”

Osama Bin Ladin was an early hint.

Worse still, it’s almost as if Newsweek only respects these bombers to the extent they have killed a number of good people: 

Bilal too sold his life cheaply.  His attack on a police station—most Iraqi police are Shia—succeeded only in killing two innocent bystanders and no cops.

And what a preposterous lie it is to pretend that these vicious murderers have nothing in common.

There has never been a more obvious motivation in the history of mass murder.

“If you’re living in hell, why not go to paradise,” says Saif al din Ali Ahmed, chief of security for the Kurdish regional government in Suleimaniya, explaining what might prompt Iraqis to take up arms.

What exactly is the hell these people are living in? They are all living in Muslim run countries. And some of the most wealthy countries on the planet at that.

Iraq even happens to be one of the very few Muslim countries (maybe the only one) where the citizenry have any real say in their government.

So besides being followers of a murder cult, what is their problem? Don’t ask Newsweek.

For Newsweek doesn’t even use the word “Muslim” once in the entire article. And Islam is mentioned thusly:

“Fighting the occupiers is a religious and national duty,” Sheikh Ahmed said. “History has taught us that occupiers can never be builders. They came for their own interests and to destroy our great Islamic values.”

Right. “Great Islamic values.”

That is obviously the one and only thing that all of these murderers have in common, despite Newsweek’s laughable pretense to the contrary.

Funny that they didn’t notice.

This article was posted by Steve on Sunday, August 5th, 2007. Comments are currently closed.

31 Responses to “Newsweek: Terrorists – Nothing In Common”

Sorry, comments for this entry are closed at this time.


« Front Page | To Top
« | »