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Newsweek: No Risk Of An Iraq ‘Civil War’

From the former news magazine, Newsweek:

Civil Bore

By Larry Kaplow | Newsweek Web Exclusive

Aug 10, 2009

Early this morning, two truck bombs in northern Iraq leveled a small village and killed at least 48 people. It hardly came as a surprise: Friday saw the death of 44 people in a massive explosion inside a local mosque. In recent weeks, there were simultaneous attacks during Friday worship at mosques and Sunday worship at churches. Even Anbar province, quieted in 2008, has seen several small bombings this summer. The attacks, U.S. and Iraqi officials agree, are aimed at rattling the postsurge security here and to reignite the sectarian strife that raged a few years ago. They look like the kind of attacks that could spark a cycle of reprisals leading to civil war.

They’re not. Iraq today is a different place than it was when ethnic conflict threatened to engulf the country in 2006. For a combination of not-at-all obvious reasons, the powder here is wetter than it once was. It’s true that Iraq is still unstable and violent. (In fact, even as the overall number of attacks remains relatively low, bombings have continued even throughout the last year of relative calm.) Most of the bombings, which are carried out by Islamist Sunni insurgents, target Shiite Muslims, just as they did in 2006. But they haven’t elicited an escalating cycle of reprisals.

For one thing, it’s harder for Sunnis and Shiites to get to each other now. Most Baghdad neighborhoods were forcibly or self-segregated in round after round of violence and displacement. Barriers close off districts to strangers, and drivers simply can’t go more than half a mile in the capital without coming to an Iraqi Army or police checkpoint. Many of the turf battles, in which blocks and homes were captured, have been settled.

For another, while Baghdad was the crucible for past violence, the recent unrest has been worst in the northern region of Nineveh, where the high-casualty bombings occurred Friday and today. Shiites are a minority in Nineveh without the power of large militias behind them, and, at any rate, attacks there do not shake the country as they would in the heart of the capital. The bombs here have also been smaller; instead of suicide attacks, they’re more often small grenades or devices left in parked cars.

What’s more, the agents of Shiite retaliation last time were loose bands of militias behind the cleric Moqtada al-Sadr. Today, they are scattered; several of them have cut peace deals with the government. Sadr himself has been living in Iran (he claims to be studying Islam) and has visited Turkey and Damascus, where regional leaders are trying to coax him into a political, rather than an armed, role…

American officials warn that they cannot reduce the bloodshed much lower than it is now and talk about keeping the violence at "tolerable" levels. That means preventing it from sapping confidence in the government, spoiling the political process, or pitting the security forces against each other. All of which are still possible. Tellingly, however, their greatest worry isn’t about Sunni-Shiite fighting; it’s about the potential for warfare between Kurdish forces and Baghdad-run military units.

By this evening, the Sunni speaker of Parliament was calling on the government to stem what he called a deteriorating security situation. But the streets in the capital were full of the usual bustle. Tolerance in Iraq is always precarious, but for now, it is holding.

Never mind that Newsweek, along with the rest of our media masters, have been claiming that our presence in Iraq has been futile because we cannot end a centuries old civil war.

Indeed, a quick Google of the terms “Iraq” AND “civil war” on the site:Newsweek.com nets a mere 1,570 mentions:

(Click images to enlarge.)

We particularly like the last article’s claim: “The Media is finally referring to the Iraq conflict as a ‘civil war.’ It shouldn’t have taken so long.”

But that was then. Under the evil regime of the warmonger George Bush.

And this now. The golden age of Barack Hussein Obama. The man who is bringing everyone on earth together.

Of course we have noticed for some time how the phrase “civil war” became quite unpopular once it became clear that the surge was working and that we might succeed in Iraq despite the best efforts of the left, after all.

Indeed, a search for "Civil War" and "Iraq" via Google Trends shows the sudden drop off:

But as we observed at the time, our media master gave up on winning power by having us lose in Iraq, and switched over to destroying the economy by inventing a recession.

Of course the important point that Newsweek is trying to make here is that the US can immediately withdraw from Iraq and nobody will suffer for it.

(Unlike, say, the millions who were slaughtered after we precipitously withdrew at the end of the First Gulf War.)

We have Newsweek’s word for it.

(Thanks to BannedbytheTaliban for the heads up.)

This article was posted by Steve on Tuesday, August 11th, 2009. Comments are currently closed.

8 Responses to “Newsweek: No Risk Of An Iraq ‘Civil War’”

  1. BannedbytheTaliban says:

    Newsweek changes its mind about what consititutes civil war in Iraq:

    Civil Bore
    Renewed violence in Iraq looks like the beginning of a sectarian melee. It’s not

    Early this morning, two truck bombs in northern Iraq leveled a small village and killed at least 48 people. It hardly came as a surprise: Friday saw the death of 44 people in a massive explosion inside a local mosque. In recent weeks, there were simultaneous attacks during Friday worship at mosques and Sunday worship at churches. Even Anbar province, quieted in 2008, has seen several small bombings this summer. The attacks, U.S. and Iraqi officials agree, are aimed at rattling the postsurge security here and to reignite the sectarian strife that raged a few years ago. They look like the kind of attacks that could spark a cycle of reprisals leading to civil war.

    They’re not. Iraq today is a different place than it was when ethnic conflict threatened to engulf the country in 2006. For a combination of not-at-all obvious reasons, the powder here is wetter than it once was. It’s true that Iraq is still unstable and violent. (In fact, even as the overall number of attacks remains relatively low, bombings have continued even throughout the last year of relative calm.) Most of the bombings, which are carried out by Islamist Sunni insurgents, target Shiite Muslims, just as they did in 2006. But they haven’t elicited an escalating cycle of reprisals.

    http://www.newsweek.com/id/211298

    The only thing different between the motivation of those committing violence then and now is who was POTUS, and of course the purpose behind Newsweeks “reporting.”

    And I’m glad Newsweek finds daily suicide bombing “Boring.”

  2. BannedbytheTaliban says:

    You have to admit, it is a pretty effective way to indoctrinate the unwashed masses. Dispel people’s concerns with unsubstantiated propaganda masquerading as “facts.” Then buttress those arguments by denouncing legitimate concerns as lies and collective indignation as manufactured. Orwell would be so proud!

  3. BannedbytheTaliban says:

    maybe ‘newspeak’

  4. beautyofreason says:

    I do not consider Newsweek to be a reliable source of information. They are apologists for the jihadists and they wear, shall we say, tinted glasses (green?) on the issue of radical Islam.

    Their previous articles:

    “Why Mumbai Wasn’t India’s 9/11,”
    “Learning to Live with Radical Islam”
    “Why Fears Of A Muslim Takeover Are All Wrong; Analyzing the forecasts of an emerging ‘Eurabia,’ hostile to America and western values”

    • proreason says:

      In a way, I disagree, beauty.

      Newsweek is a highly reliable representation of propaganda that the Facists are pushing at the moment. The magazine is a direct link from The Moron’s brain to the paper the crap is printed on.

      And they are so stupid, it’s easy to see through it.

    • beautyofreason says:

      LOL You’re right ProReason.


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