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NYT: Chi-Coms Are ‘Greener’ Than US

From those Gaia worshippers at the New York Times:


Green Power Takes Root in the Chinese Desert

By KEITH BRADSHER

July 3, 2009

DUNHUANG, China — As the United States takes its first steps toward mandating that power companies generate more electricity from renewable sources, China already has a similar requirement and is investing billions to remake itself into a green energy superpower.

Through a combination of carrots and sticks, Beijing is starting to change how this country generates energy. Although coal remains the biggest energy source and is almost certain to stay that way, the rise of renewable energy, especially wind power, is helping to slow China’s steep growth in emissions of global warming gases.

While the House of Representatives approved a requirement last week that American utilities generate more of their power from renewable sources of energy, and the Senate will consider similar proposals over the summer, China imposed such a requirement almost two years ago.

This year China is on track to pass the United States as the world’s largest market for wind turbines — after doubling wind power capacity in each of the last four years. State-owned power companies are competing to see which can build solar plants fastest, though these projects are much smaller than the wind projects. And other green energy projects, like burning farm waste to generate electricity, are sprouting up.

This oasis town deep in the Gobi Desert along the famed Silk Road and the surrounding wilderness of beige sand dunes and vast gravel wastelands has become a center of China’s drive to lead the world in wind and solar energy.

A series of projects is under construction on the nearly lifeless plateau to the southeast of Dunhuang, including one of six immense wind power projects now being built around China, each with the capacity of more than 16 large coal-fired power plants.

Each of the six projects “totally dwarfs anything else, anywhere else in the world,” said Steve Sawyer, the secretary general of the Global Wind Energy Council, an industry group in Brussels.

Some top Chinese regulators even worry that Beijing’s mandates are pushing companies too far too fast. The companies may be deliberately underbidding for the right to build new projects and then planning to go back to the government later and demand compensation once the projects lose money.

“The problem is we have so many stupid enterprises,” said Li Junfeng, who is the deputy director general for energy research at China’s top economic planning agency and the secretary general of the government-run Renewable Energy Industries Association.

HSBC predicts that China will invest more money in renewable energy and nuclear power between now and 2020 than in coal-fired and oil-fired electricity

A big impetus was the government’s requirement, issued in September 2007, that large power companies generate at least 3 percent of their electricity by the end of 2010 from renewable sources. The calculation excludes hydroelectric power, which already accounts for 21 percent of Chinese power, and nuclear power, which accounts for 1.1 percent.

Chinese companies must generate 8 percent of their power from renewable sources other than hydroelectric by the end of 2020.

The House bill in the United States resembles China’s approach in imposing a renewable energy standard on large electricity providers. But the details make it hard to compare standards. The House bill requires large electricity providers in the United States to derive at least 15 percent of their energy by 2020 from a combination of energy savings and renewable energy — including hydroelectric dams built since 1992…

At the same time, the Ministry of Environmental Protection has temporarily banned three of the country’s five main power companies from building more coal-fired power plants, punishment for their failure to comply with environmental regulations at existing coal-fired plants

But technical obstacles to renewable energy are popping up. Sandstorms in Dunhuang in the spring, for instance, will cover solar panels and render them useless until they are cleaned after each storm by squads of workers using feather brushes to avoid scratching the panels, a process expected to take two days…

This is the latest entry in the New York Times series of articles asking ‘why can’t we be more like the Communist Chinese.

Why can’t we have a command economy run by a small band of unelected oligarchs?

And, as always, The Times takes everything the Chinese government tells them as gospel:

[S]six immense wind power projects now being built around China, each with the capacity of more than 16 large coal-fired power plants…

Does any sane person believe this? Or this:

HSBC predicts that China will invest more money in renewable energy and nuclear power between now and 2020 than in coal-fired and oil-fired electricity…

If so, why is China still building two coal-fired power plants a week?

Some top Chinese regulators even worry that Beijing’s mandates are pushing companies too far too fast. The companies may be deliberately underbidding for the right to build new projects and then planning to go back to the government later and demand compensation once the projects lose money.

“The problem is we have so many stupid enterprises,” said Li Junfeng…

Don’t worry.

That could never happen here.

This article was posted by Steve on Friday, July 3rd, 2009. Comments are currently closed.

6 Responses to “NYT: Chi-Coms Are ‘Greener’ Than US”

  1. proreason says:

    “HSBC predicts that China will invest more money in renewable energy and nuclear power ”

    Probably true.

    $1,000,000 to renewable.

    $100,000,000,000 to nuclear.

  2. tranquil.night says:

    This report bugs me more than usual. The US is and always has been a leader in green technology. We invented it and continue to innovate upon it in the public and private sectors.

    My father just retired after 40 years in the wastewater industry, which is a publicly run sector. He managed a major plant down here in SoCal and saw to the development, construction, and completion of a waste-to-energy system. The plant is now powered on its own with watts to spare and sell to the community, and it generates its own profitable fertilizer rather than simply dumping the output into the ocean.

    This plan was over a decade in the making; in water/wastewater there has always concern for the environment and energy, the project did use public money, but this was before any edict for efficiency or clean demands. It was a matter simply based on a desire to improve upon an established system and make life better for one’s fellow mankind.

    Little to no government control over the issue needed. The project was done cheaply, buffed local business and opened a new market. It was done with respect to the left’s desire for cleaner environmental procedures for wastewater treatment and it was done with fiscal responsibility and innovation. And, most importantly, it was done when it didn’t even had to be.

  3. RightWinger says:

    The NY Times continuing to prove what “useful idiots” they are. The Chinese know full well that Obama is leading this country into a black hole and that Cap-n-Trade will destroy us from within. Naturally the Chinese spread this rubbish around about the giant wind projects because our State Media will run with it like the gospel. Now the militant environmentalists can point to the Slimes artical and spin away the argument that China and India have no intentions of going “green” to save the planet from the global warming hoax.

    How soon will Chavez be proclaming that Venezuela is going green to help save the world?

  4. canary says:

    So, how much fuel does a helicopter to use to get to the desert home. Kind of like the little girls in the Olympics.
    Strange at the beginning of the administration, Hillary was over there chewing China out to become green, and now they are ahead of the world.
    Baby formula that kills,
    Mercury light bulb factories are sickening and killing the workers.
    Lead paint in the toys they send us.

    • canary says:

      oohh. That may be Obama’s desert retreat and hide-out after he shafts America. The sand is his element. A little grass for doggie walks.

  5. Liberals Demise says:

    Now………where do you suppose they got the technology from or the idea?


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