« | »

NYT: Bombings Have Nothing In Common

From those tireless defenders of the faith at the New York Times:


Wounded people lie at a bomb blast site in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad July 26, 2008.

Terrorist Attacks Unsettling India

By SOMINI SENGUPTA
July 29, 2008

NEW DELHI — Over the past several years, terrorist attacks in India have become an everyday presence in everyday places. The targets seem to have nothing in common except that they are ordinary and brazenly easy to strike.

In eastern Varanasi, a deadly explosion interrupted Hindu devotees as they lighted oil lamps to Hanuman, the monkey god, one Tuesday at dusk. In southern Hyderabad, a homemade bomb planted inside a historic mosque killed worshipers on a Friday afternoon. In Mumbai, India’s largest city, nearly 200 commuters on packed city trains died in a series of blasts.

And, in the most recent attack, 17 back-to-back explosions struck shoppers and strollers on Saturday evening in Ahmedabad in western India, and then two blasts hit the very hospitals where the wounded and their relatives rushed for help, killing 49 people and wounding more than 200.

In a country long familiar with sharply focused violence — whether sectarian or fueled by insurgencies in Kashmir in the 1990s — the impersonal nature of the latest violence is new and deeply unsettling

Officials have said the attacks are attempts to provoke violence between Hindus and Muslims that have not succeeded so far. Virtually none of the attacks have resulted in convictions; a suspect in the Varanasi bombings was shot and killed by the police…

A report last year by the National Counterterrorism Center in Washington concluded that from January 2004 to March 2007, the death toll from terrorist attacks in India was 3,674, second only to that in Iraq during the same period.

Ahmedabad, home to 3.5 million people and Gujarat’s commercial center, is no stranger to violence. In 2002, a train fire that killed several dozen Hindus led to the killing of 1,000 Muslims over several days, one of the worst outbreaks of religious violence in India’s history.

An obscure group calling itself the Indian Mujahedeen warned Saturday that an attack was about to take place “in revenge of Gujarat,” plainly referring to the 2002 killings. The statement was sent in an e-mail message, written in English, to television stations just before the first blasts…

On Friday, there was a series of similar low-intensity blasts in southern Bangalore, one of which killed a woman standing at a bus stop. Two months ago in Jaipur, synchronized blasts on bicycles killed 56 people; the Indian Mujahedeen sent an e-mail message claiming credit for those attacks.

On Sunday, a police official, P. P. Pandey, said “a single mind” was suspected to be behind the three latest attacks. The police said they had detained people for questioning; The Associated Press reported 30 were in custody. Officials offered no further details about who was involved in the group or a possible motivation behind the bombings

This is highly laughable even by the standards of the New York Times.

Over the past several years, terrorist attacks in India have become an everyday presence in everyday places. The targets seem to have nothing in common except that they are ordinary and brazenly easy to strike.

Of course what these bombings all have in common is that they are perpetrated by Muslims upon Hindus. Except for the very rare occasions when the Hindus actually strike back with their own attacks.

And this has been going on for hundreds of years.

But all this is much too mysterious for the Solons at the New York Times.

Officials have said the attacks are attempts to provoke violence between Hindus and Muslims that have not succeeded so far.

Once again The Times trots out this preposterous line. These attacks are not “violence,” but only “attempts to provoke violence.”

Even when they go on to admit in the next few paragraphs:

A report last year by the National Counterterrorism Center in Washington concluded that from January 2004 to March 2007, the death toll from terrorist attacks in India was 3,674, second only to that in Iraq during the same period.

And yet these bombings in India are not “violence,” while only slightly more deadly terrorist attacks are the end of the world in Iraq.

At least according to the New York Times.

Officials offered no further details about who was involved in the group or a possible motivation behind the bombings.

Perhaps we’ll never know.

Well, not if the New York Times has its way.

(Thanks to David for the heads up.)

This article was posted by Steve on Monday, July 28th, 2008. Comments are currently closed.

3 Responses to “NYT: Bombings Have Nothing In Common”

Sorry, comments for this entry are closed at this time.


« Front Page | To Top
« | »