« | »

NYT: Mexican Drug Wars Due To 2nd Amd

From ongoing series in the New York Times:

U.S. Stymied as Guns Flow to Mexican Cartels

By JAMES C. McKINLEY Jr.

April 14, 2009

HOUSTON — John Phillip Hernandez, a 24-year-old unemployed machinist who lived with his parents, walked into a giant sporting goods store here in July 2006, and plunked $2,600 in cash on a glass display counter. A few minutes later, Mr. Hernandez walked out with three military-style rifles.

One of those rifles was recovered seven months later in Acapulco, Mexico, where it had been used by drug cartel gunmen to attack the offices of the Guerrero State attorney general, court documents say. Four police officers and three secretaries were killed.

Although Mr. Hernandez was arrested last year as part of a gun-smuggling ring, most of the 22 others in the ring are still at large. Before their operation was discovered, the smugglers had transported what court documents described as at least 339 high-powered weapons to Mexico over a year and a half, federal agents said

Noting there are about 1,500 licensed gun dealers in the Houston area, Mr. Webb added, “You can come to Houston and go to a different gun store every day for several months and never alert any one.”

The case highlights a major obstacle facing the United States as it tries to meet a demand from Mexico to curb the flow of arms from the states to drug cartels. The federal system for tracking gun sales, crafted over the years to avoid infringements on Second Amendment rights, makes it difficult to spot suspicious trends quickly and to identify people buying for smugglers, law enforcement officials say.

As a result, in some states along the Southwest border where firearms are lightly regulated, gun smugglers can evade detection for months or years. In Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, dealers can sell an unlimited number of rifles to anyone with a driver’s license and a clean criminal record without reporting the sales to the government.

At gun shows in these states, there is even less regulation. Private sellers, unlike licensed dealers, are not obligated to record the buyer’s name, much less report the sale to the A.T.F.

Mexican officials have repeatedly asked the United States to clamp down on the flow of weapons and are likely to bring it up again with President Obama when he visits Mexico on Thursday.

Sending straw buyers into American stores, cartels have stocked up on semiautomatic AK-47 and AR-15 rifles, converting some to machine guns, investigators in both countries say. They have also bought .50 caliber rifles capable of stopping a car and Belgian pistols able to fire rifle rounds that will penetrate body armor.

Federal agents say about 90 percent of the 12,000 pistols and rifles the Mexican authorities recovered from drug dealers last year and asked to be traced came from dealers in the United States, most of them in Texas and Arizona

The New York Times carries the banner high for our media masters’ full-court jihad against gun ownership in the US.

The case highlights a major obstacle facing the United States as it tries to meet a demand from Mexico to curb the flow of arms from the states to drug cartels. The federal system for tracking gun sales, crafted over the years to avoid infringements on Second Amendment rights, makes it difficult to spot suspicious trends quickly and to identify people buying for smugglers, law enforcement officials say.

Oh, that pesky Second Amendment.

But don’t worry, we won’t have to worry about it for much longer.

By the way have you ever noticed how drugs in this country is a problem of demand? Which of course is our fault.

Whereas the gun violence in Mexico is a problem of supply. Which, lo and behold, is our fault again.

Funny how that works.

This article was posted by Steve Gilbert on Tuesday, April 14th, 2009. Comments are currently closed.

8 Responses to “NYT: Mexican Drug Wars Due To 2nd Amd”

  1. BannedbytheTaliban

    FoxNews as already de-bunked the claim that “Federal agents say about 90 percent of the 12,000 pistols and rifles the Mexican authorities recovered from drug dealers last year and asked to be traced came from dealers in the United States, most of them in Texas and Arizona…” as being misleading.

    http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....r-claimed/

    But when has the truth ever gotten in the way of advancing the liberal agenda?

  2. Confucius

    So was Mr. John Phillip Hernandez here legally?

  3. Liberals Demise

    NYT is sniffing ink again!!

  4. 4USA

    By the way have you ever noticed how drugs in this country is a problem of demand? Which of course is our fault.

    Whereas the gun violence in Mexico is a problem of supply. Which, lo and behold, is our fault again.

    Nailed it!

    • Liberals Demise

      DAMN AMERICANS SHOWING OUR ARROGANCE……..AGAIN!!!!
      (and our Smith & Wessons, Colts. Barettas. Winchesters)

  5. David

    Simple solution, deny anyone who looks Hispanic from purchasing guns in these states.
    … what…are they going to complain that it is wrong to deny rights to one group of people but okay to deny rights to everyone?

  6. oldswimcoach

    CNN used the 90% figure in their report about the guns being used by the drug lords, but then showed a chinese made AK 47 as an example of the confiscated guns. Further, they described the weapons used as: grenade launchers, machine guns, and armor piercing bullets.

    Somehow I have trouble believing I could walk into a gun shop in Texas on the Mexico/Texas border without a legal US ID and buy a grenade launcher or a machine gun!

  7. Roehnan

    “In Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, dealers can sell an unlimited number of rifles to anyone with a driver’s license and a clean criminal record without reporting the sales to the government.

    At gun shows in these states, there is even less regulation. Private sellers, unlike licensed dealers, are not obligated to record the buyer’s name, much less report the sale to the A.T.F.”

    In as much as ALL weapons transfers are regulated by the BATFE (a federal agency) and dealers are required to have FFLs (a federal firearms license), I have a difficult time believing that the government doesn’t know. As far as all my experiences with purchasing weapons, they have always required a licensed dealer and paperwork. I’m calling BS on these statements.


« Front Page | To Top
« | »