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NYT: Reid’s Hometown Doesn’t Like Him

From a deeply concerned New York Times:

Even in His Hometown, Reid Is Source of Anguish

By ADAM NAGOURNEY
October 27, 2010

SEARCHLIGHT, Nev. — This shrinking town in the desert has endured its indignities over the years. It has been referred to as a ghost town, a description that galls the 800 or so people who still call it home. It was once famous for its brothels, a reputation that, though hard to quarrel with, is not exactly something to brag about.

We seem to recall that Mr. Reid likes to brag about it.

But now it has come to this. Its most famous resident, Harry Reid, the Senate majority leader — whose house is visible from the road, who has a school and a street named after him, who can be spotted eating lunch at the smoky Searchlight Nugget Casino

Once every six years, for the last couple of days in October.

[Reid] as become the symbol of a potential Democratic collapse in Washington, as polarizing a figure as exists in American politics

This is news to us. Or rather, it is news to New York Times readers, who have been told for years what a moderate mainstream political figure Mr. Reid is.

This has put Searchlight, with its Joshua trees, scrub brush, abandoned gold mines, coyotes, rattlesnakes and trailer parks, on the map…

And neighbor or not — and “bring home the bacon” benefactor or not — Mr. Reid has become as contentious a figure in Searchlight as he is in the rest of the state. The mere mention of his name is apt to set off disagreements among even the best of friends.

“I just think he is a real phony,” John McCoy, 50, said as he and Joan Mesenbrink wandered around to a tiny graveyard carved into rocks on top of a hill, where Mr. Reid’s family is buried and where Mr. Reid intends to be buried

You have to wonder what took the people of Searchlight and Nevada in general so long to figure this out. But, of course, hardly anybody ever heard of him before January 2007. And those who had, probably assumed he was a conservative.

Searchlight, 60 miles south of Las Vegas, rising on hillsides along U.S. 95 after 35 vast miles of untouched desert, stands as a rather extreme example of the economic problems that have darkened this state and become Mr. Reid’s political bane

These days, the mines and the brothels are gone, and Searchlight is more a collection of double-wide trailers and abandoned homes for sale; even a church has a “for sale” sign on it

As has Mr. Reid – for years. (Speaking of brothels.)

“This town’s getting old, let’s put it that way,” said Harold Harper, who used to be the town constable, when there was a town constable. “There are mostly just older people who don’t get out much.”

Whew. So we’re talking about old poor ‘shut ins.’ Trailer park dwelling white trash. So of course some of them don’t like Mr. Reid. You had us worried there for a minute, Mr. Nagourney.

[F]or the most part, people have learned to avoid the subject of Mr. Reid in this election season.

And that is of course the way Mr. Reid and the New York Times would like to keep it. 

“It’s split right down the center,” Jon Palmer said as he sat by a slot machine. “I hear as many good things as bad things. And you have to remember that a lot of people here went to elementary school with Harry Reid.”

Mr. Reid may well have changed from his elementary school days. And not for the better.

Asked if people here are proud to have Mr. Reid come from this town, Ms. Doing responded: “They always have been. Now, I don’t know.”

Mr. Reid was born and raised here, though he seems as reclusive in Searchlight as he is in Washington. People know he is in town when the shutters come down on the house and the black vans operated by the Capitol Police are parked outside

Which again, only occurs once every six years, during the last couple of weeks of October. As regular as clockwork.

Here, as in the rest of Nevada, no one is willing to guess who is going to win on Tuesday. But most people think that if Ms. Angle becomes Senator Angle, Mr. Reid will be back in Searchlight.

Sure he will. Just as soon as he unloads his million dollar Ritz Carlton condominium in DC. (Which he bought with cash.)

“He’s pretty tough, I think he’ll take it in stride,” Ms. Doing said of a potential loss. “He has great religious faith. He’s not going to have a nervous breakdown over it, I am certain of that.”

We’re not so sure. Mr. Reid seems to have nervous breakdowns quite regularly on camera.

And what is this "religious faith" of which Ms. Doing speaks? Surely she can’t mean his professed Mormonism?

This article was posted by Steve on Thursday, October 28th, 2010. Comments are currently closed.

6 Responses to “NYT: Reid’s Hometown Doesn’t Like Him”

  1. Liberals Demise says:

    If no one lived in his run down home town, they still wouldn’t like him.
    What the hell is there to like about Mr. Wrinkles?

  2. proreason says:

    “Searchlight is more a collection of double-wide trailers and abandoned homes for sale”

    Just so.

    Because when one of the denizens of a community accumulates mega-millions by working less than two years in his life, and lives in a Ritz Carlton condo, as just one of his homes, then chances are the others will be living in the dirt.

    That is how it has always been, ever since politicians discovered the wonderful gulability of their fellow men about 10,000 years ago.

  3. Rusty Shackleford says:

    At the end of the day, Dingy Harry is just another angry putz who has done his damnedest to get as rich as possible while in office and has believed that he knows better for what the people DESERVE (no, not what they NEED..a completely different concept) and has set his goals to that end. By virtue of his actions, one could say he is antisocial.

    an·ti·so·cial [ˌæntɪˈsəʊʃəl]
    adj.
    1. Shunning the society of others; not sociable.
    2. Hostile to or disruptive of the established social order; marked by or engaging in behavior that violates accepted mores: gangs engaging in vandalism and other antisocial behavior.
    3. Antagonistic toward or disrespectful of others; rude.

    Or:

    antisocial [ˌæntɪˈsəʊʃəl]
    adj
    1. avoiding the company of other people; unsociable
    2. contrary or injurious to the interests of society in general

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/antisocial

  4. Right of the People says:

    I don’t like you either, Harry.

  5. Helena says:

    “It’s split right down the center,” …. “I hear as many good things as bad things. And you have to remember that a lot of people here went to elementary school with Harry Reid.” …

    So they know how twisted he is deep down.

    Here, as in the rest of Nevada, no one is willing to guess who is going to win on Tuesday. But most people think that if Ms. Angle becomes Senator Angle, Mr. Reid will be back in Searchlight.

    So they will do anything to keep him in Washington.

  6. platypus says:

    So Dingy Harry is like that ‘special’ relative every family has. You know, the one that nobody really likes but out of respect for the family name they still invite him to Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners.

    But nobody associates with him during the rest of the year.


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