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NYT Carries George Soros’ Water – Again

Apparently the downsizing New York Times is now outsourcing its “research.”

In this case (and of course not for the first time), The Times is regurgitating the work of a George Soros minion:

Nicole Kenley, whose mother, Sandra M. Kenley, a permanent resident of the United States [and twice convicted drug felon], was detained at Dulles Airport and died seven weeks later in custody.

New Scrutiny as Immigrants Die in Custody

By NINA BERNSTEIN

Sandra M. Kenley was returning home from her native Barbados in 2005 when she was swept into the United States’ fastest-growing form of incarceration, immigration detention.

Seven weeks later, Ms. Kenley died in a rural Virginia jail, where she had complained of not receiving medicine for high blood pressure. She was one of 62 immigrants to die in administrative custody since 2004, according to a new tally by Immigration and Customs Enforcement that counted many more deaths than the 20 previously known.

No government body is charged with accounting for deaths in immigration detention, a patchwork of county jails, privately run prisons and federal facilities where more than 27,500 people who are not American citizens are held on any given day while the government decides whether to deport them.

Getting details about those who die in custody is a difficult undertaking left to family members, advocacy groups and lawyers.

But as the immigration detention system balloons to meet demands for stricter enforcement of immigration laws, deaths in custody — and the secrecy and confusion around them — are drawing increased scrutiny from lawmakers and from government investigators.

Spurred by bipartisan reports of abuses in detention, the Senate unanimously passed an amendment to the proposed immigration bill that would establish an office of detention oversight within the Department of Homeland Security. Detention capacity would grow by 20,000 beds, or 73 percent, under the bill, which is expected to be debated again today in the Senate.

Complaints focus on a lack of independent oversight and failures to enforce standards for medical care, suicide prevention and access to legal help.

The inspector general in the Department of Homeland Security recently announced a “special review” of two deaths, including that of a Korean woman at a privately run detention center in Albuquerque. Fellow detainees told a lawyer that the woman, Young Sook Kim, had pleaded for medical care for weeks, but received scant attention until her eyes yellowed and she stopped eating.

Ms. Kim died of pancreatic cancer in federal custody on Sept. 11, 2005, a day after she was taken to a hospital…

Officials with the immigration agency say that some deaths are inevitable, and that sufficient outside scrutiny comes from local medical examiners. Detention expanded by more than 32 percent last year, and the average length of stay was cut to 35 days from 89, said Jamie Zuieback, a spokeswoman.

“We spend $98 million annually to provide medical care for people in our custody,” Ms. Zuieback said. “Anybody who violates our national immigration law is going to get the same treatment by I.C.E. regardless of their medical condition.”

She declined to release information about the 62 detention deaths since 2004, including names, dates, locations or causes.

Twenty deaths were reported over the same period in a recent briefing paper for the United Nations’ special rapporteur on the human rights of migrants from a list compiled by civil liberties lawyers from reports by relatives, advocates and the news media.

Detention standards were adopted by the immigration agency in 2000, but are not legally enforceable, unlike rules for the treatment of criminal inmates. The Department of Homeland Security has resisted efforts by the American Bar Association to turns the standards into regulations, saying that rulemaking would reduce the agency’s flexibility.

“The deaths bring forward in the worst way the systemwide problems,” said Sunita Patel, a lawyer for Legal Aid who prepared the United Nations briefing paper

In the case of Ms. Kenley, a legal permanent resident of the United States for more than 30 years, detention interrupted her medical care for high blood pressure, a fibroid tumor and uterine bleeding. An autopsy attributed her death to an enlarged heart from chronic hypertensive disease. But a report by emergency medical services said that she had fallen from a top bunk, and that a cellmate had pounded on the door for 20 minutes before guards responded…

A transcript shows [Kenley] admitted a conviction for drug possession in 1984 and one in 2002 for trying to buy a small amount of cocaine

She also showed that she was taking blood pressure medication and was scheduled for surgery.

The inspector arrested her, invoking the law: two drug-related convictions made her subject to exclusion from the United States…

Even detainees with legal counsel sometimes do not survive

Some deaths, like Ms. Kim’s, come to light well after the fact. Ms. Kim, a cook of about 60, was swept up in a raid on a massage parlor and detained for a month at the Regional Correctional Center in Albuquerque, a county prison operated by the Cornell Companies, a publicly traded corporation

Yes, it is clear that one of the main problems is that these detention centers are sometimes run by companies instead of the famously efficient healthcare providers in the federal government.

Note too how The Times pretends that these small and (probably statistically expected) numbers are shocking — and had to be uncovered by their crack investigation:

She was one of 62 immigrants to die in administrative custody since 2004, according to a new tally by Immigration and Customs Enforcement that counted many more deaths than the 20 previously known.

In truth, as the article later reveals, the “20 previously known” was just a number from illegal aliens rights groups and other agitators:

Twenty deaths were reported over the same period in a recent briefing paper for the United Nations’ special rapporteur on the human rights of migrants from a list compiled by civil liberties lawyers from reports by relatives, advocates and the news media.

And given the federal officials have refused to release any names, these heart-rending stories in The Times’ article are surely taken from the “briefing paper” from the UN’s “rapporteur.”

This, it turns out, was actually the work of just one person:

Sunita Patel, a lawyer for Legal Aid who prepared the United Nations briefing paper.

And just who is this worthy that the United Nations and the New York Times should take what she claims as gospel?

Why, she is a George Soros hireling:

Soros Justice Fellowships

Sunita Patel
2006

Legal Aid Society

The vast majority of immigration detainees are housed in county jails on a contractual basis with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Meaningful governmental oversight and community accountability has not accompanied the increased reliance on county jails. By establishing the Community Accountability Project at the Legal Aid Society, Sunita Patel will build on past efforts in New York and New Jersey to develop a replicable model for greater transparency and public accountability for detention operations in New Jersey jails. The project aims to collect and expose the problems with detention through a volunteer network to conduct both human rights/detention standards documentation and individual advocacy. Patel also seeks to create independent community oversight for detention operations through public accountability boards.

Patel is a law clerk for the Hon. Judge Ivan L. R. Lemelle, Eastern District of Louisiana. She obtained her MA at Tulane University and her JD from American University Washington College of Law, where she started the Immigrant Rights Coalition, which focused economic/workers’ justice and immigrant detention. As a law student, she was a student attorney in the Human Rights Law Clinic and interned with Senator Kennedy’s office of the Judiciary Committee. She worked with civil rights and immigrant rights organizations such as the Center for Constitutional Rights, the Legal Aid Society of Manhattan, and the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund. Patel recently published an article entitled “Performative Aspects of Race: ‘Arab, Muslim, and South Asian’ Racial Formation After September 11” in the UCLA Asian Pacific American Law Journal.

Prior to law school, Patel worked at the Southern Center for Human Rights in Atlanta investigating conditions of confinement in Alabama and Georgia juvenile detention centers, prisons, and jails. She has also worked as a community organizer and trainer with a multiracial group of youth in New Orleans and for human rights organizations in India and in South Africa.

Gee, what a background. Ms. Patel even worked for that champion of illegal alien “rights” Senator Kennedy — and the (Communist) Center For Constitutional Rights. Surely her research is unbiased and above reproach. 

But it’s funny how The Times neglected to mention any of these pesky details. Apparently that is how they protect their “sources.”

Still, Homeland Security should be able to cure advanced pancreatic cancer and drug-induced enlarged hearts for “immigrants.” In addition to giving them all lawyers.

And if they can’t, then they have no right to detain these innocent souls.

The New York Times George Soros has spoken.

This article was posted by Steve on Tuesday, June 26th, 2007. Comments are currently closed.

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