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Obama: I’m A Product Of The Radical ’60s

From Obama’s second autobiography, The Audacity Of Hope – Thoughts On Reclaiming The American Dream, pp 19-20:

I’VE ALWAYS FELT a curious relationship to the sixties. In a sense, I’m a pure product of that era: As the child of a mixed marriage, my life would have been impossible, my opportunities entirely foreclosed, without the social upheavals that were then taking place. But I was too young at the time to fully grasp the nature of those changes, too removed—living as I did in Hawaii and Indonesia—to see the fallout on America’s psyche. Much of what I absorbed from the sixties was filtered through my mother, who to the end of her life would proudly proclaim herself an unreconstructed liberal. The civil rights movement, in particular, inspired her reverence; whenever the opportunity presented itself, she would drill into me the values that she saw there: tolerance, equality, standing up for the disadvantaged.

In many ways, though, my mother’s understanding of the sixties was limited, both by distance (she had left the mainland of the United States in 1960) and by her incorrigible, sweet-natured romanticism. Intellectually she might have tried to understand Black Power or SDS or those women friends of hers who had stopped shaving their legs, but the anger, the oppositional spirit, just wasn’t in her. Emotionally her liberalism would always remain of a decidedly pre-1967 vintage, her heart a time capsule filled with images of the space program, the Peace Corps and Freedom Rides, Mahalia Jackson and Joan Baez.

It was only as I got older, then, during the seventies, that I came to appreciate the degree to which—for those who had experienced more directly some of the sixties’ seminal events—things must have seemed to be spinning out of control. Partly I understood this through the grumblings of my maternal grandparents, longtime Democrats who would admit that they’d voted for Nixon in 1968, an act of betrayal that my mother never let them live down. Mainly my understanding of the sixties came as a result of my own investigations, as my adolescent rebellion sought justification in the political and cultural changes that by then had already begun to ebb. In my teens, I became fascinated with the Dionysian, up-for-grabs quality of the era, and through books, film, and music, I soaked in a vision of the sixties very different from the one my mother talked about: images of Huey Newton, the ’68 Democratic National Convention, the Saigon airlift, and the Stones at Altamont. If I had no immediate reasons to pursue revolution, I decided nevertheless that in style and attitude I, too, could be a rebel, unconstrained by the received wisdom of the over-thirty crowd.

Barack grew up with a hippy activist mother. We are supposed to believe that she never spoke to her son about the Weather Underground or the SDS?

She never spoke to him or her friends in his presence about William Ayers? Bernadine Dohrn?

Moreover, Mr. Obama says he “investigated” the 1960s. He says the radicals of that period inspired him.

Radicals like Huey Newton and the rioters at the ’68 Democrat Convention. Obama says he modeled himself after them.

And yet Obama never read about Bill Ayers or Bernadine Dohrn?

Sure, we believe him.

This article was posted by Steve on Tuesday, October 7th, 2008. Comments are currently closed.

18 Responses to “Obama: I’m A Product Of The Radical ’60s”

  1. 1sttofight says:

    He is the product of a seriously screwed up family which explains why he is so screwed up.

  2. JBean says:

    Interesting.

    Obama wasn’t all that enamored of the ’60’s in “Dreams,” published in 1995:

    It made me smile, thinking back on Frank and his old Black Power, dashiki self. In some ways he was as incurable as my mother, as certain in his faith, living in the same sixties time warp that Hawaii had created.

    That’s it the only mention of the sixties in his “memoir.” He doesn’t talk about “investigating the ’60’s” when he talks about his high school experience — radical black writers, yes, ’60’s, not at all.

    But “Audacity” was published in 2006, and his teenage memories were revised….could it be because he had by then been long acquainted with two people who’ve never left their obsessive, self-serving, egotistical, self-aggrandizing memories of the “glorious” ’60’s behind?

  3. platypus says:

    “… my maternal grandparents, longtime Democrats who would admit that they’d voted for Nixon in 1968, an act of betrayal that my mother never let them live down.”

    I guess that explains why “typical white” grandma is now domiciled under the bus.

  4. Icarus says:

    He is the product of a seriously screwed up family which explains why he is so screwed up.

    You can’t choose your family 1st !

    But you can choose the way you live your life, your spouse, your friends, who you associate with, where you work and for who, where you go to Church, etc.

    Any contrast? Guess not!

    He can’t leave the thing (Ideology) that he grew up with. His mother left a lasting impression!
    …..so did Norman Bates’ mother!

  5. 1sttofight says:

    It usually takes a strong person to go against their family, looks like Barry aint a strong person.

  6. wardmama4 says:

    How can this man claim his mom was – ‘but the anger, the oppositional spirit, just wasn’t in her. Emotionally her liberalism would always remain of a decidedly pre-1967 vintage’ – yet deny that she married (not once but twice) two foreign black men? One who appears to have already been married (naivity or sheer disregard for the laws/standards of the time) which at the time simply wasn’t done by midwestern girls (especially ones still in a relationship with her parents). Like his father whom he takes pot shots – ‘They were gone . . .and their once-a-year letters full of dime store advice. (Dreams From My Father, pg 118) -Yet the book was so driven to finding out who his father was.

    He is full of an extreme form of leftist desire to create an upheavel of America’s society, culture and basic foundations – much like the radicals his mother, fathers and apparently his friends, associates and wife are and always have been.

    He is busy being both sides of the issues (listen to his denials – well ok – his campaigns denials of his ‘associates’ ) yet he touted it when it was convenient to – but even in the book he walked both sides.

    The only thing Obama has any expertise in is being two faced and speaking with a forked tongue on just about everything and everyone in his life – does America really want someone as President who doesn’t have the courage of his convictions to stand up for those closest to him? Or perhaps they too are just stepping stones on his pathway to being Master of the Universe – and isn’t that scary too – to use your own family simply to further your own ambitions? And how base of a person are you to have no care or concern for even your own family?

  7. Greg England says:

    If I had no immediate reasons to pursue revolution, I decided nevertheless that in style and attitude I, too, could be a rebel, unconstrained by the received wisdom of the over-thirty crowd.

    Translation: Wisdom does not exist … I am a liberal.

    That’s the price you pay for democracy folks! If enough people want a liberal administration, then that’s exactly what you get.

    We are lucky in the UK, because at present the Labour party is centre-left but not nauseatingly liberal.
    However, we still suffer from an entrenched liberal establishment (e.g. the Archbishop of Canterbury)

    PS: I’m a great fan of Dennis Prager’s aphorism – the 1960s were the Age of Stupidity

  8. wirenut says:

    Greg England , at least we “still” have privately owned firearms for now . Our biggest fear is professional politicians. I hate to mooselimb up on ya, but we will take care of ourselves . Forget the man-boy “messiah”, and “the plug” . This is far from over . G.B. has had its setbacks also . We can weather this .

  9. Liberals Demise says:

    This is for Wardmama: Obama isn’t the only blackman looking for who his fatheris and he IS the product of two screwed up humans! He just grew up in the sixties!

  10. Greg England says:

    I hate to mooselimb up on ya, but we will take care of ourselves.

    I know you will. That’s why I visit US conservative blogs, to read a worldview that is utterly different to anything I encounter in my everyday life.

    A few years ago I was on holiday in DC visiting relatives. I spent my time immersed in the American revolution … and I got it.

    Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness as endowed by God. Simple yet profound because it involves a Copernican Revolution in the way you view the relationship between the individual and government.

    That’s why liberals don’t get it. Their belief in government trumps everything (including religious faith, hence the reference to the very liberal Archbishop) and as a consequence they are utterly incapable of grasping the concept. But once you get it, you are free (even if “prudence dictates” that one continues to live in a system that doesn’t fully recognise those freedoms …. e.g. I am still a British subject).

    But hey, they used to say that to “be born an Englishman is to win first prize in the lottery of life” so as far as compromises go, it’s one I can live with for now. (Until I get really good at my job, that is)

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1990807/Two-million-Britons-emigrate-in-10-years.html

  11. DEZ says:

    Greg England;
    Come on over already, your more than welcome in the U.S.A.

  12. texaspsue says:

    “Greg England;
    Come on over already, your more than welcome in the U.S.A.”

    Sure enough DEZ. And we’ll even trade two Liberals, (they would go to England), per Greg England and every member of his family as an exchange rate. :-)

  13. JohnMG says:

    texaspsue; ………” we’ll even trade two Liberals……”

    C’mon tex, let’s not be cheap. The exchange rate should be two dozen liberals and a billy goat in exchange for one good conservative imported from anywhere. Heck, I’d even be willing to throw in shipping and handling for the goat.

  14. texaspsue says:

    You’re right JohnMG, how selfish of me…… two dozen Libs and a goat it is. LOL

  15. DEZ says:

    Anybody else think about Steve Gilbert lately?
    I have, a few short years ago, I found this site via Ann Coulter, and lurked around just reading the posts.
    The articles held my attention well enough, as they were not what were common among the mainstream media.
    But what really drew me in was the few, but regular posters commentary.
    If not for SJ, 1st, DW, Wardmama and many other posters that drew my attention with their wit and straight forward views, I most likely would have viewed this site a few times and moved on.
    It was a small but close knit group, I felt at home, I also found that I was not alone in my world view.
    Now I see so many new names, most with closely resembling viewpoints.
    I feel even less alone in my world view as the number of posters increases.

    Thanks Steve.

  16. DEZ says:

    “Sure enough DEZ. And we’ll even trade two Liberals”

    Can we make that a few million liberals?
    Wait, France would get their collective panties in a bunch!
    And damn, a goat is worth at least a 1000 liberals.

  17. JohnMG says:

    The goat was just to cover up the stench of the liberals. Do you have any idea how hard it was to find a goat that’d go along with the plan?!! He insisted on a round-trip ticket.

  18. Liberals Demise says:

    I smell a law suit coming from the goats lawyer and PETA for animal cruelty!!


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