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Poll Says Body Tearing Debt Stress Up 14%

From that well-known economic wizard, Jeannine Aversa, and the rest of the scientists at the Associated Press:

[AP caption:] In this May 9, 2008 file photo, a foreclosure sign stands outside an existing home on the market in Denver. The stress from deepening debt is becoming a major pain in the neck, and backs and heads and stomachs, for millions of Americans. When people are dealing with mountains of debt, they’re much more likely to report health problems, too, according to an Associated Press-AOL Health poll.

AP-AOL poll: Debt stress tears at your body, too

By JEANNINE AVERSA, AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON – The stress from deepening debt is becoming a major pain in the neck — and the back and the head and the stomach — for millions of Americans.

When people are dealing with mountains of debt, they’re much more likely to report health problems, too, according to an Associated Press-AOL Health poll. And not just little stuff; this means ulcers, severe depression, even heart attacks.

Take Edward Driscoll, 38, of Braintree, Mass. He blames debt — $10,000 worth — for contributing to his ulcers and his wife Kimberly’s panic attacks. “Just worrying, worrying, worrying, you know, where the next payment of this is going to come from,” he says.

Although most people appear to be managing their debts all right, perhaps 10 million to 16 million are “suffering terribly due to their debts, and their health is likely to be negatively impacted,” says Paul J. Lavrakas, a research psychologist and AP consultant who analyzed the results of the survey. Those are people who reported high levels of debt stress and suffered from at least three stress-related illnesses, he says.

That finding is supported by medical research that has linked chronic stress to a wide range of ailments.

And the current tough economic times and rising costs of living seem to be leading to increasing debt stress, 14 percent higher this year than in 2004, according to an index tied to the AP-AOL survey.

Among the people reporting high debt stress in the new poll:

27 percent had ulcers or digestive tract problems, compared with 8 percent of those with low levels of debt stress.

— 44 percent had migraines or other headaches, compared with 15 percent.

— 29 percent suffered severe anxiety, compared with 4 percent.

— 23 percent had severe depression, compared with 4 percent.

— 6 percent reported heart attacks, double the rate for those with low debt stress.

— More than half, 51 percent, had muscle tension, including pain in the lower back. That compared with 31 percent of those with low levels of debt stress.

People who reported high stress also were much more likely to have trouble concentrating and sleeping and were more prone to getting upset for no good reason

It isn’t known for certain whether such stress is causing health problems, says Lavrakas, who while at Ohio State University in the late 1990s helped to develop an index to measure the extent to which people are stressed from financial debts.

But medical research suggests that most of the symptoms reported in this poll are indeed typical of chronic stress. The body reacts with a “fight-or-flight” response, releasing adrenaline and the stress hormone cortisol. That helps you react fast in an emergency, but if the body stays in this high gear too long, those chemicals can wreak physical havoc in numerous systems — everything from a rise in blood pressure and heart rate to problems with memory, mood, digestion, even the immune system.

And no, stress doesn’t cause stomach ulcers — most are caused by bacteria — but stress can worsen the pain.

Regardless of the health implications, Americans are taking on more debt as tough economic times — slowing economic activity, job losses, soaring energy and food prices, slumping home values and record home foreclosures — strain many people’s budgets.

Revolving consumer debt, almost all from credit cards, now totals $957 billion, compared with $800 billion in 2004, according to the Federal Reserve.

Average car loans are up, too, to $27,397, from $24,888 four years ago. Home mortgages total $10.5 trillion, compared with $7.8 trillion in 2004.

If that’s not enough to rattle you, consider this. The share of households’ after-tax income that goes to serving financial obligations was nearly 20 percent in 2007, up from 18.5 percent in 2004, said Scott Hoyt, senior director of consumer economics at Moody’s Economy.com.

No wonder people are feeling stressed

Just think how much less stress there would be in the country if Ms. Aversa and the rest of the “reporters” at the Associated Press would stop telling us we are in a recession when we are not.

Have they no compassion for their fellow man?

Still, notice what the AP buried in their scare piece:

It isn’t known for certain whether such stress is causing health problems, says Lavrakas, who while at Ohio State University in the late 1990s helped to develop an index to measure the extent to which people are stressed from financial debts

In other words, the whole article is based upon a lie.

Even so, these ‘victims’ should put together a class action lawsuit against the AP and the rest of the media fear mongers.

This article was posted by Steve on Monday, June 9th, 2008. Comments are currently closed.

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