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Sequester Cuts Add 165,000 New Jobs In April!

From a conflicted Associated Press:

US employers add 165K jobs, rate falls to 7.5 pct.

By Christopher s. Rugaber | May 3, 2013

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers added 165,000 jobs in April, and hiring was much stronger in the previous two months than first thought. The gains trimmed the unemployment rate to a four-year low of 7.5 percent.

The Labor Department report showed the job market is improving despite higher taxes and government spending cuts.

Hilarious. The always loyal AP is still trying to stick to the company line that the sequester cuts are hurting the economy. Despite the fact that it’s the sequester cuts, which only took effect in April, are driving all of this new hiring.

So maybe we should have done a sequester sooner. In fact, if a measly 2% reduction in the rate of government spending produces these kind of dramatic results, maybe we should try some real cuts.

In addition to the April gains, the government said employers added 138,000 jobs in March and 332,000 in February. That’s 114,000 more over the two months…

Months we were told previously, suffered because of fears about the upcoming sequester.

Wouldn’t it be ironic if the evil Republican’s sequester cuts end up frustrating Obama’s plan to prolong the recession so he can further expand the welfare state? (As FDR did during the Great Depression.)

A fire overnight at the Labor Department’s headquarters shut down the building for most employees. Members of the media were allowed in for the release of the report.

What evidence were they trying to burn?

And here is the same news, as spun by Reuters:

Job growth beats expectations in April

By Lucia Mutikani | May 3, 2013

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Employment rose more than expected in April, pushing the unemployment rate to a four-year low of 7.5 percent, which could help ease concerns of a sharp slowdown in the economy.

And yet they didn’t put ‘unexpectedly’ in their headline.

Nonfarm payrolls rose 165,000 last month, the Labor Department said on Friday. March’s payrolls were raised to 138,000, 50,000 more jobs than previously reported, and February’s job count was revised up to 332,000, the largest since May 2010.

Economists polled by Reuters had expected April payrolls to rise 145,000 and the unemployment rate to hold steady at 7.6 percent. The drop in the unemployment rate last month reflected an increase in employment, rather than people leaving the workforce.

Which is probably a first under Obama.

Still, details of the report remained consistent with a slowdown in economic activity. Construction employment fell for the first time since May, while manufacturing payrolls were flat. The average workweek pulled off a nine-month high, but average hourly earnings rose four cents…

Notice that plucky Reuters is also valiantly trying to toe the company line. Darn that sequester!

This article was posted by Steve Gilbert on Friday, May 3rd, 2013. Comments are currently closed.

3 Responses to “Sequester Cuts Add 165,000 New Jobs In April!”

  1. Liberals Demise

    More happy news from those that tote the empty water pail for the regime’s liars.
    As I have noticed here for the past 4 years, next week we’ll get the revised numbers.
    Wait and see is my attitude.

  2. The statistics don’t distinguish between part-time and full time work. More and more people are having their hours cut so they won’t burden the employer with ObummerScare. Even municipalities are doing this.

    Remember all the years under Bush, 2004 to 2008, when the unemployment rate was 5 to 5.5%? The Demonicrats screamed that we were actually in a recession caused by Iraq and “out-of-control spending!”

    The Puppet Press and Regime Media are a disgrace, and they know it.

  3. canary

    More jobs is ObamaCare back lash. Businesses are hiring more part-time employees who will work under the 30 hours a week.

    Also, with tax returns people spend.

    Summer vacations leads businesses a little short in the summer so part time jobs are the norm.




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