« | »

The Mind Of A New York Times Reporter

Granted, the screed posted below is what the New York Times laughingly calls an editorial. But its author, Timothy Egan, has only very recently begun writing editorials.

Before then his editorials appeared in the news section:


About Timothy Egan

Timothy Egan worked for 18 years as a writer for The New York Times, first as the Pacific Northwest correspondent, then as a national enterprise reporter. In 2006, Mr. Egan won the National Book Award for his history of people who lived through the Dust Bowl, The Worst Hard Time. In 2001, he won the Pulitzer Prize as part of a team of reporters who wrote the series How Race Is Lived in America

Ah, yes. The Times’ “national enterprise reporter” would want to focus on the Dust Bowl and race relations in America. It’s only natural.

Anyway, keep Mr. Egan’s biography in mind as you read the following rant from the editorial pages of New York Times:

My Own Private Focus Group

October 8, 2008

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. —- I didn’t hook up people to electronic monitoring devices, nothing to measure leg trickles and blood-sugar spikes in response to off-key talking points.

I had no magic maps, no demographic weighting formulas. I simply went to the heart of one of the fastest-growing, most Republican counties in the land — as red as rib-eye steak on the e-coli side of raw — and wandered aimlessly, like John McCain in Tuesday’s debate.

Here in Colorado Springs — the Vatican of evangelical political power, home to the Air Force Academy and a community where optimism usually matches the sunrise glow at the base of Pikes Peak – you can see what will happen in less than a month.

My friends: it’s not good for Senator McCain.

“As a small business owner, it’s very hard to watch a lifetime of hard work and savings just wither away in the last two weeks,” said Jan Martin, a native of this more-than-mile-high city, and a lifelong Republican. “The debate on Tuesday night has, if anything, bolstered my opinion.”

So Jan Martin, who also serves on the city council, will cross party lines in less than a month and vote Barack Obama for president, she said. She’s not leaving the Republican party — she’s deserting the nominee.

But…but…what about Bill Ayers? That radical! Obama served on some charity boards with him — he must be a terrorist sympathizer! And what about Sarah Palin’s claim, with a knowing wink, that Obama “is not a man who sees America the way you and I see America.”

The sludge of insinuation is loose, but has no more staying power than the Chicago Cubs in a playoff series. (And I like the Cubbies.) All the desperate demagogues of talk radio and Fox News, summoning the kooks and fringe lunatics for one last blast of scary Barack Hussein Obama talk, are melting in 2008’s bonfire of economic vanities.

You want scary? How about this: two trillion dollars. That’s the amount that Americans have lost over the last 15 months in their retirement accounts.

“The financial crisis is point number one,” said Pastor Brady Boyd, head of New Life Church, 250,000 square feet of concentrated Christianity. “These attacks against the candidates are just irrelevant right now. Why are you all attacking one another when we’re dying out here?”

The pastor oversees a mega-church with 10,000 members. When I was here four years ago, Pastor Ted Haggard, the onetime head of the National Association of Evangelicals, boasted of his conference calls with Karl Rove and his deep affection for George Bush.

But then, Pastor Ted was a very bad boy, caught up in a meth and male prostitute scandal. He left New Life and went off to get rehabbed at some place that was supposed to make him right in the head.

Pastor Brady Boyd is a different breed of evangelical. His political suggestions this year, delivered in a sermon on Sunday and repeated in our interview, were simple.

“The only advice I give is pray, fast and vote, and that can be for any political party,” he said.

This year, the church hasn’t even heard from the McCain campaign. “What’s happening to us is less allegiance to the Republican party, and more to our core principles,” he said.

Which gets us to the second message to come from Colorado Springs: on election day, there will be no repeat of 2004, when people woke up to the surprise that “moral values” was the leading issue of the campaign, according to exit polls.

Down the road, Focus on the Family is still in a bit a of dither over what to do about John McCain. James Dobson, the founder of what is essentially a political action committee for evangelicals, had said earlier this year he would never vote for McCain. Never. Not under any circumstances.

Now he’s changed his mind. Sort of.

“While I said I will not endorse either candidate this year, I can say I’m now supporting John McCain,” he said in his October newsletter. However, “the senator continues to embrace issues that concern me.”

Dobson’s Web site contains outdated-looking scare alerts with headlines like “American Airlines extends special benefits to homosexuals.”

Dobson is yesterday. Boyd is tomorrow, saying that the environment, the poor, and helping those in his church who’ve lost a job or a house are things that matter to his congregation.

Abortion? Homosexuals? Bill Ayers?

“To be focused on those things at a time when people are hurting would really be to the detriment of families,” said Boyd.

Obama will not win Colorado Springs. John Kerry got just 32 percent of the vote in this county in 2004. But if Obama gets 40 percent — which is what Democrats expect based on the surge of newly registered voters and independents who are following Jan Martin’s path — he will win this state, and the election.

That leaves the circus of Sarah Palin and the sad specter of a snarling John McCain fading as they embrace the slippery bonds of the last century.

Alas, it is hard to see why this is even published as an editorial. It reads like just another “news report” from the New York Times.

Highly selective quotes from highly selected sources. All carefully chosen to represent the author’s point of view.

It is very much like every other report Timothy Egan has filed as “news” over the last 18 years for The Times.

Here, courtesy of a handy archive of Mr. Egan’s “news” articles, are just the latest handful:

The Oil Man Cometh

By TIMOTHY EGAN

“Totally misleading” is the way T. Boone Pickens describes Republican attempts to convince the public that if we opened up more areas to oil drilling then gas prices would fall.

July 24, 2008

They Get It

By TIMOTHY EGAN

The furor over this week’s New Yorker cover boiled down to whether those folks in fly-over country would get it. Irony, it turns out, does cross the Hudson River.

July 16, 2008

Big Sky Slugfest

By TIMOTHY EGAN

In Montana, Democrats love the extended campaign, with its huge rallies and relentless pounding of John McCain.

April 5, 2008

Fresh Ideas for a Tired Crusade

By TIMOTHY EGAN

If it takes a churchgoing guidebook writer who spent his college years as a member of the marching band to call for an end to a tired war, so be it.

April 1, 2008

Disorder on the Border

By TIMOTHY EGAN

Both John McCain and Gov. Janet Napolitano of Arizona have been shaped by lessons in how simplistic slogans rarely work as policy.

March 29, 2008

Bear this reporter in mind whenever you read anything in the New York Times. He is just one of any number of examples. And he is not even the most obvious or outrageous.

Still, it’s hard to blame any of them. They are just doing what they are paid to do.

They too know that the The Times is actually in the business of socialist political indoctrination. 

Not news reporting.

This article was posted by Steve on Sunday, October 12th, 2008. Comments are currently closed.

15 Responses to “The Mind Of A New York Times Reporter”

  1. 1sttofight says:

    Funny that they never, never quote any “life long democrats” who are going to vote for McCain/Palin.

    BTW, both my brothers, a niece and her husband plus several close friends are going to do that this election.

    McCain is going to win whether he wants to or not.

  2. wardmama4 says:

    -‘you all attacking one another when we’re dying out here’- I can’t stand this distruction of the meaning of words (SIr, prove to me one single solitary person who has died due to this ‘crisis’). Here is a supposed minister who feels that people who signed loans that they shouldn’t have gotten is more important than anything else.
    Of course
    -‘two trillion dollars. That’s the amount that Americans have lost over the last 15 months in their retirement accounts’- Which of course is going to be helped fixed made even worse by adding a $700 billion dollar tax burden unto those very people –

    1st – Here locally the Dems (lifelong) aren’t going for the big O because while they may be Dems – union Dems at that – they are also Catholics. And life is trumping Party around here – especially with such an extreme anti-life candidate.

  3. jcvheuvel says:

    “As a small business owner, it’s very hard to watch a lifetime of hard work and savings just wither away in the last two weeks,” said Jan Martin, a native of this more-than-mile-high city, and a lifelong Republican. “The debate on Tuesday night has, if anything, bolstered my opinion.”

    If she thinks a lifetime of hard work and savings has withered away because of republicans, do you think, maybe she deserved it?

  4. Anonymoose says:

    The “editorial” takes a few incidents; someone deciding to vote for Obama, someone else deciding they’ll grudgingly vote McCain, and turning it around to suit himself.

    Essentially all he can say is the economic meltdown is foremost on people’s minds, which is to be expected. However, if it weren’t I’m pretty certain the Mighty O’s shady connections would be front and center. After all, where is he mentioning in his “editorial” the fantastic economic plan that Obama and his minions have in store to save the day? After all, wouldn’t people be flocking to him because he actually has something to offer other than “change?”

    And beneath it all it’s the same argument pattern the liberals always use, which consists of:

    We’re ahead, socially and politically, you’re not.

    We’re smarter than you.

    You have no right to argue or question.

    Lather, rinse and repeat.

  5. 1sttofight says:

    wm4, did you see the video I linked in the new stuff thread? I teared up watching it. Sarah Palin is so normal, very rare in a politician.

  6. U NO HOO says:

    “You want scary? How about this: two trillion dollars. That’s the amount that Americans have lost over the last 15 months in their retirement accounts.”

    We haven’t lost anything in our retirement account(s).

    What did we do wrong?

    Maybe we aren’t Americans.

  7. sheehanjihad says:

    here’s what I dont get. Ok, we lost trillions….who made it? who got paid those trillions? did that figure only exist on financial institution’s paper? If so, it wasnt there to start with, so who lost what? If it was, where the hell did it go? And if it went somewhere, who has it now?

    See? This is confusing. Somehow, someone on here can boil it down a bit and explain it to me, and perhaps others will understand it a bit more too.

    as I see it, if you had it, someone was holding it. If you lost it, someone else had to give it up to someone else, or it was just a figure on paper and didnt exist. Or did it? Where is it? HUH? WHERE?

    My head is going to explode.

  8. texaspsue says:

    Exactly SJ. If you find out let us know as I would like to know who to thank (sarc.) for taking part of my 401K.

    Could it be that we are facing economic terrorism? Purposeful market manipulation? This makes no sense.

    Business bad guys.

    http://www.foxnews.com/video2/video08.html?maven_referralObject=3147148&maven_referralPlaylistId=&sRevUrl=http://www.foxnews.com/

  9. sheehanjihad says:

    one of the “wont go away” buzzes floating around is the the democrats sat back and did nothing knowing full well the financial markets would implode because they needed something to blame the GOP on, and since the war in Iraq wasnt losing anymore, they were desperate for something to lord over everyone so they could send someone to “save us”.

    It makes perfect sense to me, since the democrats blocked every attempt at legislation on Freddie mac and Fannie Mae….knowing that a gullible public would demand the heads of whoever was President at the time, which is why it happened NOW, and not November 5th. The smugness and hubris of pelosi reid shumer et al was palpable, and they knew full well this would benefit their party at the expense of a public they could give a damn about anyway.

    What they didnt count on, was this world wide crisis they caused. they just thought things would look bad until the election, and the messiah would raise his mighty hand and rescue all of us from “them”. Now, they are looking like the smarmy bastards they are, because things are out of control.

    but then, I am not an expert. Lets all rely on the unbiased MSM to explain it all away for us, shall we? Hussein will have his hands full, we will be broke, they will not, and not counting the thirty pieces of silver the democrats were paid, they will not be hurting at all. None of them.

  10. BillK says:

    I love the “we’re dying out here.”

    Oooh, retirement accounts went down.

    That hurts, but economic advisors have said – uh, forever – that if you’re retiring within five or even ten years you shouldn’t have money in stocks.

    Amazing how many folks 62 and over apparently didn’t remember that because of their belief that you know, the 4% they could get in a bank just wasn’t enough return.

    DItto that for those who, even worse, were invested almost exclusively in company stock.

    Now for “lifelong” Republican Jan Martin?

    From the website of the ACLU of Colorado Springs:

    THE AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION
    COLORADO SPRINGS CHAPTER holds its
    ANNUAL MEETING
    Tuesday, April 15 � 7 PM � Slocum Hall � Colorado College

    With
    Nominations of new members

    And its
    SPRING FORUM

    THE COLORADO PARTY CONVENTIONS:

    PROTECTING FREE SPEECH and PUBLIC SAFETY

    With
    Taylor Pendergrass, ACLU-Colorado Staff Attorney,
    Main Speaker
    and

    Jan Martin, Colorado Springs City Council
    Bill Sulzman, Peace & Justice activist leader
    Steve Liebowitz, Deputy Chief of Police
    Dennis Apuan, Vice-Chair, El Paso County Democratic Party

    Here’s a description of “lifelong Republican” Jan Martin’s vision for Colorado Springs:

    The only non-incumbent elected to City Council was Jan Martin. Aside from being the only non-incumbent—and the only woman—Jan was the number one vote-getter in the election. Jan’s slogan was, “We can do better!” She vowed to reach beyond the status quo, invigorate economic development, promote civic engagement, and advocate for our arts and culture. Jan stood for change and diversity in our community.

    http://www.citizensproject.org/FW%20Archived%20PDF/Freedom%20Watch%202007/041907watch.pdf

    But perhaps the most important thing of all?

    All week, the Obama campaign has been tilling the Republican soil – not just in El Paso County, but around Colorado. On Wednesday, it established the Colorado Republicans for Obama, including counting Colorado Springs City Councilwoman Jan Martin as a key member.

    http://m.rockymountainnews.com/news/2008/sep/06/palin-power-energizes-colorado-springs/

    The date of the article above? September 6, 2008.

    So the quote above:

    “As a small business owner, it’s very hard to watch a lifetime of hard work and savings just wither away in the last two weeks,” said Jan Martin, a native of this more-than-mile-high city, and a lifelong Republican. “The debate on Tuesday night has, if anything, bolstered my opinion.

    Martin acknowledged the support for Obama could cost her, but said she knew several Republicans who were ready to vote for the Democrat in November. Martin invoked the word “change” several times.

    Is from a person who was a founding and charter member of “Republicans for Obama,” founded over a month ago.

    Typical reporting from the Times – it only takes thirty seconds and a single Google search to find the truth behind their spin.

  11. The Redneck says:

    “The only advice I give is pray, fast and vote, and that can be for any political party,” he said.

    Maybe that has something to do with the fact that conservative churches actually follow the law about endorsing candidates from the pulpit….

  12. Reality Bytes says:

    I haven’t seen DEZ lately, but if Obama looses, is it possible to photoshop a picture of Keith Oberman with his jaw slacked open with only his desk breaking its fall down to his shoes as a kind of tribute to Big Daddy Roth

    http://edroth.com/nonflash/Shopping/Art/art-tn.html

  13. DEZ says:

    “I haven’t seen DEZ lately,”

    Meep, meep!

  14. 1sttofight says:

    “I haven’t seen DEZ lately,”

    I have never actually seen him.

    Sorry, I guess I am just feeling a little randy today. ;)

  15. Icarus says:

    Abortion? Homosexuals? Bill Ayers? “To be focused on those things at a time when people are hurting would really be to the detriment of families,” said Boyd.

    uh huh!!! Yup…. Okay

    A license to drive, a degree to open a practice, etc, etc yet any stupid can vote.

    Doesn’t make much sense!


« Front Page | To Top
« | »