« | »

WP Finally Admits ‘Plame-Gate’ Was A Lie

Someone has captured the editorial board of the Washington Post and replaced them with semi-rational people:

End of an Affair

It turns out that the person who exposed CIA agent Valerie Plame was not out to punish her husband.

Friday, September 1, 2006; Page A20

WE'RE RELUCTANT to return to the subject of former CIA employee Valerie Plame because of our oft-stated belief that far too much attention and debate in Washington has been devoted to her story and that of her husband, former ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV, over the past three years. But all those who have opined on this affair ought to take note of the not-so-surprising disclosure that the primary source of the newspaper column in which Ms. Plame's cover as an agent was purportedly blown in 2003 was former deputy secretary of state Richard L. Armitage…

It follows that one of the most sensational charges leveled against the Bush White House — that it orchestrated the leak of Ms. Plame's identity to ruin her career and thus punish Mr. Wilson — is untrue. The partisan clamor that followed the raising of that allegation by Mr. Wilson in the summer of 2003 led to the appointment of a special prosecutor, a costly and prolonged investigation, and the indictment of Vice President Cheney's chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, on charges of perjury. All of that might have been avoided had Mr. Armitage's identity been known three years ago

Nevertheless, it now appears that the person most responsible for the end of Ms. Plame's CIA career is Mr. Wilson. Mr. Wilson chose to go public with an explosive charge, claiming — falsely, as it turned out — that he had debunked reports of Iraqi uranium-shopping in Niger and that his report had circulated to senior administration officials. He ought to have expected that both those officials and journalists such as Mr. Novak would ask why a retired ambassador would have been sent on such a mission and that the answer would point to his wife. He diverted responsibility from himself and his false charges by claiming that President Bush's closest aides had engaged in an illegal conspiracy. It's unfortunate that so many people took him seriously.

It's funny, but I don't remember the Washington Post ever saying that "far too much attention and debate in Washington has been devoted to her story and that of her husband, former ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV, over the past three years."

But now it’s:

“Never mind.”

Still, it's nice to see the DNC’s house organ, the Washington Post, be the ones to put last nail in this totally fraudulent story.

But where pray tell is the Post’s demand for Patrick Fitzgerald's head?

All of that might have been avoided had Mr. Armitage's identity been known three years ago…

Excuse me, but it wasknown by Mr. Fitzgerald — from the very start. That is the real crime here.

Armitage is guilty of being a gossip. And maybe a coward. But Mr. Fitzgerald is guilty of prosecutorial misconduct of near Nifong-ian magnitude.

Armitage and Fitzgerald should both go to jail. But Fitzgerald should get the longer sentence.

Let’s see just a little of that self-righteous outrage from the Post that they heaped upon Ken Starr for actually doing his job.

This article was posted by Steve Gilbert on Friday, September 1st, 2006. Comments are currently closed.

33 Responses to “WP Finally Admits ‘Plame-Gate’ Was A Lie”

Sorry, comments for this entry are closed at this time.


« Front Page | To Top
« | »